Petroleum Institute Lacks Space To Accomodate Students

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In short
Kigumba Petroleum Institute in Kiryandongo district has run out of space to accommodate students. The institute was established two years ago to give Ugandans expertise in oil and gas courses given the oil discovery in Bunyoro sub-region.

Kigumba Petroleum Institute in Kiryandongo district has run out of space to accommodate students.
 
The institute was established two years ago to give Ugandans expertise in oil and gas courses given the oil discovery in Bunyoro sub-region.
 
It is hosted at the Kigumba Cooperative College premises about ten kilometers from Kiryandongo town council.
 
The school made its admission in August last year with 28 students.
 
According to Harmony Asiimwe, the Institute Administrator, the school has been overwhelmed by the number of admissions this year.
 
Asiimwe says despite the fact that only a cream of the best performers with 20 points and above at “A” level is taken, 60 students were admitted this year.
 
Asiimwe says the one block the institute was offered cannot accommodate all the 88 students currently enrolled.
 
Due to lack of space, the 60 students in first year are now being accommodated at the Uganda Polytechnic School Kyema, about 20 kilometers away in Masindi Municipality.
 
Only 28 students in second year are residing at the main campus in Kigumba. However Asiimwe says plans are underway to build the school’s own campus.
 
She explains that the cooperative college has offered over 200 acres of land for the petroleum institute to establish its own campus.
 
The institute, the first of its kind in Uganda, intends to produce Ugandan trained manpower to work in the new oil industry. The students study on government sponsorship
 
Charles Kwesiga, the principal of the institute says students are trained on a number of oil and gas subjects under a curriculum designed from oil producing countries like Norway, Italy and Trinidad and Tobago among others.
 
Kwesiga says however that the curriculum is still undergoing modification with input from countries with experience in oil studies.
 
Students graduate with an ordinary diploma in oil and gas studies and they are later sent to oil producing countries for hands-on training. On Thursday, four of the second year students flew to Norway for practical lessons.
 
Of the 88 students at the school, four are UPDF soldiers and only 8 are females.
According to Kwesiga, applications are always invited for legible students and interviews later held for admissions.

 

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