Report: Uganda 143rd Most Corrupt Country

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In short
Uganda is ranked 143 out of 182 countries surveyed meaning that Uganda has declined from its 130th ranking in 2009. The report, released on Thursday in Berlin, Germany shows that Uganda scored the same as Togo, Nigeria and Russia.

A 2011 Transparency International report on corruption perception ranks Uganda among the most corrupt countries in the world. 

Uganda is ranked 143 out of 182 countries surveyed meaning that Uganda has declined from its 130th ranking in 2009. The report, released on Thursday in Berlin, Germany shows that Uganda scored the same as Togo, Nigeria and Russia.

The index score relates to perceptions of the degree of corruption as seen by business people and country analysts and ranges between zero, which is highly corrupt, and 10, which is very clean. Uganda scored 2.4 indicating that a lot has to be done to fight corruption.

In East Africa, Uganda came in third after Rwanda ranked 49 and Tanzania at position 100. Kenya came in fourth in the region at 154 while Burundi is a distant last at 172.

New Zealand (1), Denmark (2), Finland (2), and Sweden (4) are the least corrupt countries. Only Botswana (32) and Rwanda (49) are in the club of 50 countries of the world that have entrenched the war against corruption in their official ranks. Somalia and North Korea were the most corrupt countries, both at position 182.

The Corruption Perceptions Index ranks countries according to their perceived levels of public-sector corruption. The 2011 index draws on different assessments and business opinion surveys carried out by independent and reputable institutions.

The report indicates that the surveys and assessments used to compile the index include questions relating to the bribery of public officials, kickbacks in public procurement, embezzlement of public funds, and questions that probe the strength and effectiveness of public-sector anti-corruption efforts.

Perceptions are used because corruption – whether frequency or amount – is to a great extent a hidden activity that is difficult to measure. Over time, perceptions have proved to be a reliable estimate of corruption. Measuring scandals, investigations or prosecutions, while offering ‘non-perception’ data, reflect less on the prevalence of corruption in a country and more on other factors, such as freedom of the press or the efficiency of the judicial system.

The Corruption Perceptions Index complements Transparency International’s many other tools that measure corruption and integrity in the public and private sectors at global, national and local levels.