Acute Food Shortage Fuels Migration In Kaabong

5010 Views Kaabong, Uganda

In short
Rising food insecurity in Kaabong district has fueled out-migration of people into the neighbouring Kitgum district and the Turkana region in Kenya.

Rising food insecurity in Kaabong district has fueled out-migration of people into the neighbouring Kitgum district and the Turkana region in Kenya.

Local government authorities estimate 100,000 people to have moved out of Kaabong district in the last five months in search of food for survival.

Nakiru Lilly, the LC5 Councilor for Kamion Sub County, who hails from the Ik community, explains that since the floods destroyed crops last year leading to no harvest the people are in bad shape. She goes on to say that residents have tried to survive on wild leaves and fruits. She identifies Timo, Kamion, Morungole and Lokwakaramoi parishes among others as worst hit in the sub county.
 
Nakiru notes that over 40,500 households are food insecure in the marginalized community of the Ik. She appeals to government to consider delivering food in the area. The Ik, sometimes called Teuso, live were displaced from their land in 1958 as the British colonial administration created the present day Kidepo Valley National Park.

Okoth Nyalulu, the Resident District Commissioner Kaabong, attributes the outmigration to harsh food shortages in the area. He explains that for the last two years the community has not had any harvest. He adds that natural hazards like floods and prolonged drought scared thousands of families from cultivation. He adds that lightning strikes also scared people away from their gardens.

Joseph Midi, the LC5 Chairperson Kaabong district, says several reports have been sent to government but with no serious response. He says migration is continuing all over the district as people search means of survival. He appeals to partners in development to find means of saving the people.

 

About the author

Olandason Wanyama
Olandason Wanyama is the Karamoja region bureau chief. Amudat, Nakapiripirit, Moroto, Abim, Kotido and Kaabong districts fall under his docket. Wanyama has been a URN staff member since 2012.

The former teacher boasts of 20 years journalism experience. Wanyama started out as a freelance writer for the Daily Monitor newspaper in 1991 in Entebbe. Wanyama also wrote for the army publication Tarehe Sita, the Uganda National Roads Authority (UNRA) magazine and The New Vision. While not on the beat, Wanyama taught child soldiers at Uganda Airforce School-Katabi.

Wanyama is very interested in conflict reporting, climate change, education, health and business reporting. He is also an avid photographic chronicler of vanishing tribal life in the East African region.