27 Dead In Juba Fighting

2083 Views Kampala, Uganda

In short
There is still tension in Juba, the South Sudanese capital following what President Salva Kiir called an attempted military take-over of government on Monday. At least 27 people have been killed in clashes, according to Makur Korion, the Under-Secretary for Health. More than 150 others were injured in the fighting.

There is still tension in Juba, the South Sudanese capital following what President Salva Kiir called an attempted military take-over of government on Monday.
 
There are reports of fresh sporadic gunfire in the city, even though the Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) officials say the situation is under control. Sources in Juba say there is still low activity in the city part from the massive military presence. 
 
On Monday, President Kiir declared a curfew in the city after more than 10 hours of fighting between different elements of the SPLA. Kiir told the media that the fighting was orchestrated by elements loyal to his sacked vice president, Dr Riek Machar, whom he described as a prophet of doom.
 
The rift between Kiir and Machar widened in July when the president removed his deputy from office during a cabinet reshuffle. Machar, who is the vice chairman of the ruling SPLM party, leads a faction of the party that is opposed to President Kiir’s style of leadership. At the time the fighting broke out on Sunday, Machar’s group had walked out of a party meeting that was to endorse the constitution and party manifesto.
 
At least 27 people have been killed in clashes, according to Makur Korion, the Under-Secretary for Health. More than 150 others were injured in the fighting. While the government says the bodies are currently at the Juba Hospital mortuary, URN understands that at least one body of a Ugandan was yesterday transported to Arua.
 
Radio Miraya quotes government officials as saying the gunfire -- including the sporadic firing of heavy weapons -- resumed in the early hours of Tuesday and was still audible by 9am. AFP reports that the streets of the capital were deserted, with only military vehicles to be seen and civilians barricaded in their homes.
 
Radio Miraya further quotes the UN officials as saying that up to 67,000 people are now camped at the United Nations Mission—UNMISS—offices where access to basic needs is fast becoming a problem because of the numbers.