694 Wildlife Attacks Reported In Central Uganda Since 2007

2686 Views Kampala, Uganda

In short
Close to 500 people have either been injured or killed by the wild animals between 2007 and 2013 in central Uganda. The figures are contained in a report titled “General Problem Animal Management Report from 2007-2013.”

Close to 500 people have either been injured or killed by the wild animals between 2007 and 2013 in central Uganda.
 
The figures are contained in a report titled "General Problem Animal Management Report from 2007-2013."
 
According to the report, the most common attacks were by the crocodiles with 153 cases reported representing 22 percent of the total attacks. Monkeys had the second highest attacks with 129 cases reported between 2007 and 2013, with leopards taking the third spot with 126 cases registered. At least 115 cases of snake bites were registered as well as 50 cases of Hippo attacks within the same period.
 
The rest of the attacks were by birds, Monitor Lizards, tortoise Pangolins and others.
 
The report says the issue of problem animals is still a big challenge to Uganda Wildlife Authority (UWA). There is still inadequate capacity within UWA to effectively manage problem animals; similarly, the districts seriously lack the technical capacity to manage vermin, and that problem animal victims and damages are on the increase in most parts of the country.
 
UWA annual problem animal data base reveals steady increase in cases reported from 37 in 2007, 68 in 2008, 67 in 2009, 85 in 2010, 134 in 2011, 166 in 2012 and 137 in 2013.
 
Peter Ogwang, the Assistant Warden in charge of problem animal management at Uganda Wildlife Authority, says almost every week; someone is attacked by a wild animal in any part of the country. He says prior to 2009, most of the attacks would go unnoticed because the communities were not aware of where to report. He names areas around Nakaseke, Nakasongola, areas around Lake Victoria, Kyoga and along the Nile as the hot spots for the attacks.
 
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Ogwang says UWA has now embarked on massive campaigns to educate the locals in dangers of wildlife. He says most of the wild animals do not attack if not provoked. He says as part of the sensitization campaign, they inform the locals of the feeding hours of the wildlife, their habits and areas where they are likely to be many.
 
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Ogwang says as protection measures, the authority has constructed cages in Lakes Edward and George from where residents can fetch water without being attacked by the crocodiles. Ogwang says UWA will continue to construct trenches and other facilities to deter animals from attacking communities.
 
Several cases of wildlife attacks have been reported in various parts of the country. However, the issue of compensation of the victims remains thorny. Currently, there is no compensation policy in place and when victims are attacked, they cannot legally claim for compensation.