Amnesty Commission Stuck with Mentally Ill Returnees

1560 Views Kampala, Uganda

In short
Amnesty Commission spokesperson Moses Draku says that the two men, believed to Ugandan nationals, were brought in from Beni by The United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo MONUSCO.

The Amnesty Commission in Uganda is stuck with two mentally ill ex-combatants flown in from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

Amnesty Commission spokesperson Moses Draku says that the two men, believed to Ugandan nationals, were brought in from Beni by The United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO).

It is however not clear whether they were part of the Lord's Resistance Army or the Allied Democratic Front.  The two, whose identities are yet to be established, are now undergoing treatment and receiving psychosocial support.  Draku says that they will now monitor and treat the condition to prepare them for amnesty.

Draku also noted that as amnesty commission they are negotiating and encouraging ADF combatants to help them secure amnesty. So far 13,000 LRA rebels and 2,000 ADF rebels have been demobilized over the last 10 years.

Today, the Amnesty Commission receives one to two cases of reporters from the LRA and ADF monthly.

In the 1990's ADF rebels declared war on the Ugandan government attacking Kasese, Kabarole and Bundibugyo. The rebel group was later displaced by the Uganda People's Defense Force's forcing them to retreat to the jungles of the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Its leader Jamil Mukulu was arrested in March 2015 in Tanzania after he attempted to acquire travel documents for his children. Mukulu is currently on trial.

The LRA was also forced out of Northern Uganda with its leader Joseph Kony still at large. The LRA saw thousands of people in Northern Uganda killed and millions displaced.

 

Mentioned: updf adf lra

About the author

Alex Otto
“Journalism that changes lives is my goal,” Alex Otto has said on more than one occasion. That is his career’s guiding principle. Has been since he was a radio journalist in the northern Ugandan town of Gulu in 2009.

Otto passionately believes his journalism should bring to the fore the voices of the voiceless like the shooting victims of Apaa. Otto tries in his journalism to ask tough questions to those in positions of authority.

Based in the Kampala bureau, Otto is especially interested in covering agriculture, politics, education, human rights, crime, environment and business. He has reported intensively on the post-conflict situation in northern Uganda.

A URN staff member since 2014, Otto previously worked with The Observer Newspaper from 2012 to 2013 and later the Institute for War and Peace Reporting IWPR based in Gulu.

He was the URN Gulu bureau chief 2014-2016.