Charity Project Hangs In Balance Over Land Wrangles

1980 Views Nwoya, Uganda

In short
Acholi Sally Foundation earmarked over 5 square miles of land in Lunik village in Nwoya district to establish a farm to support Orphans and vulnerable children.

The launch of Acholi Sally Foundation, a charity project, which seeks to support orphans and vulnerable children in Nwoya district, hangs in balance because of land conflicts.
 
Acholi Sally Foundation earmarked over 5 square miles of land in Lunik village in Nwoya district to establish a farm to support orphans and vulnerable children.
 
However, William Carpenter, one of the directors of the project says they have failed to secure land despite following all the necessary procedures.
 
He says they are considering relocating to another area to kick start the project.
 
//Cue in:  “They are telling us…”
Cue out:  “…we can utilize”//
 
Patrick Okello Oryem, the Nwoya LC V chairperson says the project was rejected by the land owners until they are compensated. He advises the foundation to follow the right procedures to access the contested land.

//Cue in: “This people…
Cue out: “…that is their land”//
 
Sadik Oboo, a resident of Lunik village says he gave his grandfathers land to sally foundation to establish the farming project in Got Okwara in Nwoya district but the district chairperson blocked it.
 
He blames Patrick Okello Oryem, the Nwoya LC V chairperson for fuelling the land conflict when he incited residents to occupy his family land illegally.
 
Several organizations are faced with challenges of acquiring land in post conflicts areas in Northern Uganda for either failing to follow the right procedures or land grabbers. 
 
 

 

About the author

Alex Otto
“Journalism that changes lives is my goal,” Alex Otto has said on more than one occasion. That is his career’s guiding principle. Has been since he was a radio journalist in the northern Ugandan town of Gulu in 2009.

Otto passionately believes his journalism should bring to the fore the voices of the voiceless like the shooting victims of Apaa. Otto tries in his journalism to ask tough questions to those in positions of authority.

Based in the Kampala bureau, Otto is especially interested in covering agriculture, politics, education, human rights, crime, environment and business. He has reported intensively on the post-conflict situation in northern Uganda.

A URN staff member since 2014, Otto previously worked with The Observer Newspaper from 2012 to 2013 and later the Institute for War and Peace Reporting IWPR based in Gulu.

He was the URN Gulu bureau chief 2014-2016.