Clerics To Preach Against HIV/Aids

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In short
The inter-religious council of Uganda (IRCU) has asked religious leaders throughout the country to create time and space for preaching against HIV/Aids.

The inter-religious council of Uganda (IRCU) has asked religious leaders throughout the country to create time and space for preaching against HIV/Aids.
 
In their communication, a pastoral letter from the council of the presidents of the IRCU, the religious leaders called for different faiths to emphasize an HIV/Aids free nation through curbing the rising epidemic in churches, mosques and other places of worship.
 
In the message that the religious leaders are supposed to read out to their congregation, the adults have been advised to take an HIV test to know their status and also lead a lifestyle of self-control and self-respect with regard to their sexual behaviours.
 
The pastoral letter also urges people infected with HIV to be responsible and avoid passing on the virus to other people, stating that they should choose a faith-based lifestyle that will help them stay safe.
 
The letter warns that there might be trouble in the future in accessing antiretroviral medication for positive-living persons as the number of infections is in the increase.
The IRCU Secretary General Joshua Kitakule said that for Uganda to be free of HIV/Aids people should stop spreading the virus and then also strategies should be put in place to curb new cases.
 
The pastoral letter was signed by 5 leaders including Archbishop Jonah Lwanga of Uganda Orthodox Church, Archbishop Stanly Ntagali of the Church of Uganda, Sheikh Shaban Ramadhan Mubajje, the Mufti of Uganda, Dr Cyprian Kizito Lwanga, the Catholic Archbishop of Kampala and Dr John Kakembo, the president of the Seventh Day Adventist church. 

Up to 1.2 million people are currently living with HIV in Uganda.

 

About the author

Alex Otto
“Journalism that changes lives is my goal,” Alex Otto has said on more than one occasion. That is his career’s guiding principle. Has been since he was a radio journalist in the northern Ugandan town of Gulu in 2009.

Otto passionately believes his journalism should bring to the fore the voices of the voiceless like the shooting victims of Apaa. Otto tries in his journalism to ask tough questions to those in positions of authority.

Based in the Kampala bureau, Otto is especially interested in covering agriculture, politics, education, human rights, crime, environment and business. He has reported intensively on the post-conflict situation in northern Uganda.

A URN staff member since 2014, Otto previously worked with The Observer Newspaper from 2012 to 2013 and later the Institute for War and Peace Reporting IWPR based in Gulu.

He was the URN Gulu bureau chief 2014-2016.