Survey: Developing Countries Ask For Clean Energy Financing Top story

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In short
Countries in Africa, Asia and the Caribbean say they are finding difficulties implementing the recommendations of the Paris Climate Change Agreement in 2015 without financial support from the developed world.

Countries in Africa, Asia and the Caribbean say they are finding difficulties implementing the recommendations of the Paris Climate Change Agreement in 2015 without financial support from the developed world.
  
This is a key finding of a survey conducted by the secretariat of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) on behalf of the Nairobi Framework Partnership (NFP), which looks at what is required so that countries can implement the "Nationally Determined Contributions."
  
The Paris Climate Change Agreement in 2015 marked a high water mark in international diplomacy, with countries presenting about their contribution to emissions reduction.
  
A total of 79 countries including Uganda replied to the survey, which was carried out by the UN Climate secretariat in Germany through its Regional Collaboration Centres (RCCs) in East Africa, West Africa, Asia and Latin America and the Caribbean.  Uganda is hosting the East Africa Regional Collaboration Centre in Kampala.
  
Uganda and other countries' national climate plans - known as Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) in UN lingua - were on areas like climate change mitigation and adaptations. A major feature of the plans was the need to extend clean energy to countries.
  
The central goal of the Paris Agreement is to limit the global average temperature rise to as close as possible to 1.5 degrees Celsius.
  
Transitioning the power sector to low carbon is crucial to meet this goal, as generating power using coal, gas and oil is the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions which cause climate change.
  
Findings of the survey released on Thursday show that whilst many countries are receiving some form of support from international organisations, in most cases this support is not enough. The survey clearly indicates that countries believe that making use of the UN's Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), Standardised Baselines and Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) can help them to achieve their climate action commitments.
  
Under the Clean Development Mechanisms, projects in developing countries earn a saleable credit for each tonne of greenhouse gas they reduce or avoid, including through projects in the power sector.
  
Uganda recently commissioned an over 32,000 photovoltaic panel solar plant producing an initial 10 MW of electricity, fed into the national and local grid. The US$19 million Soroti Solar Plant is in part funded by the European Union - Africa Infrastructure Trust Fund through the GET FiT Solar facility that promotes renewable energy projects.
  
State Minister for Energy, Simon D'Ujanga said many more of such plants would be put across the country if donors provided more funds.
  
Uganda's Nationally Intended Determined Contributions (NIDC) are aligned with the National Development Plan and national energy policy which, among others, seeks to promote renewable energy options like solar, geothermal and hydroelectricity. 
  
Uganda committed to undertake a series of mitigation policies aimed at cutting emissions by 22% by 2030. It also commits to a series of adaptation measures.
  
Like other countries, Uganda hoped to tap into 100-billion-dollar annual international climate finance that developed countries pledged at the Copenhagen climate summit in 2009. But the money has not been flowing as expected.
 
The Commissioner Climate Change Department, Chebet Maikut, whose department responded to the UN Climate Secretariat survey, could not be reached to outline more of Uganda's specific financing requirements or projects in the pipeline.