District Production Coordinator Arrested Over Forgery

1783 Views Fort Portal, Uganda

In short
Col. Charles Muhumuza, the coordinator of OWC in-charge of the Rwenzori region says that Abigaba distributed less than the 700 coffee seedlings he was supposed to supply to beneficiaries in Kasenda and Kabonero Sub Counties.

Kabarole district Production Coordinator Salvatore Abigaba has been arrested for allegedly forging signatures of beneficiaries of the Operation Wealth Creation - OWC programme.

The program, which runs under the National Agricultural Advisory Services-NAADS, was started to enhance household participation in commercial agricultural production. It is used for community mobilization, distribution of agricultural inputs, and facilitation of agricultural production chains across the country. It is implemented by Uganda People's Defense Forces Soldiers - UPDF.

Col. Charles Muhumuza, the coordinator of OWC in-charge of the Rwenzori region says that Abigaba distributed less than the 700 coffee seedlings he was supposed to supply to beneficiaries in Kasenda and Kabonero Sub Counties.

It its alleged that Abigaba, and another seed supplier, Kenneth Mugenyi, forged signatures of 100 beneficiaries acknowledging that they had received the seedlings.

However, when a team from OWC visited the two sub counties, some of the beneficiaries complained that they had never received the coffee seedlings. Abigaba was then summoned to explain the delay in the delivery of inputs, a close scrutiny of the forms indicated that there were cases of forgery.

Abigaba was arrested this morning by detectives from the Criminal Investigation Department. He is currently detained at Fort Portal Police station.

Godliva Twinomugisa, the Officer in Charge of Criminal Intelligence and Investigations- CIID department, Kabarole district, says that investigations into the case are ongoing.

On Monday, the team led by Col. James Nkojo visited Kasenda Sub County, where they found more than 10,000 coffee seedlings rotting away. Some of the beneficiaries said that the inputs were supplied to them without consultation while others lacked adequate land to grow the coffee.