Government Seeking US$8bn for Refugee Crisis

2376 Views Kampala, Uganda

In short
The Prime Minister, Ruhakana Rugunda, says Uganda needs USD 2 billion annually to handle the ever increasing costs of the humanitarian and long term needs of the growing number of refugees.

Uganda is hunting for USD$ 8billion to handle the refugee crisis for the next four years. The Prime Minister, Ruhakana Rugunda, says Uganda needs US$D 2 billion annually to handle the ever increasing costs of the humanitarian and long term needs of the growing number of refugees.

 
He was presenting a report on the status of the forthcoming Refugee Solidarity Summit where government hopes to raise US$ 2bn as a short term measure to close the gap in the refugee crisis. Rugunda says they are hoping that through the generous donation of Governments, foundations and private agencies, they will be able to raise the money.

 
 
Uganda ranks amongst the top refugee hosting countries with more than 2000 refugees crossing into the country from South Sudan each day for the last six months. There are currently 1.2 million refugees in Uganda.

 

//Cue in: "The above numbers…

Cue out:…a chance to work"//

 
He says they will discuss Uganda's model that integrates refugee's issues in the national development agenda among others during the summit. Uganda has been credited for giving refugees land for cultivation and allowing them to integrate and mix freely with locals.
 

The Solidarity summit, which will be held from 22-23rd June at Speke Resort Munyonyo, is aimed at supporting and strengthening Uganda's progressive and transformative approach to refugee protection, through mobilization of new funding to meet the long term needs of the refugees.


It is convened and jointly hosted by President, Yoweri Museveni and the United Nations Secretary General, Antonio Guteress with support from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, Filippo Grandi.


 
South Sudan refugees started pouring in Uganda in December 2013 following clashes between forces loyal to South Sudan President, Salvar Kiir and his First Vice President, Riek Machar.

 

About the author

Alex Otto
“Journalism that changes lives is my goal,” Alex Otto has said on more than one occasion. That is his career’s guiding principle. Has been since he was a radio journalist in the northern Ugandan town of Gulu in 2009.

Otto passionately believes his journalism should bring to the fore the voices of the voiceless like the shooting victims of Apaa. Otto tries in his journalism to ask tough questions to those in positions of authority.

Based in the Kampala bureau, Otto is especially interested in covering agriculture, politics, education, human rights, crime, environment and business. He has reported intensively on the post-conflict situation in northern Uganda.

A URN staff member since 2014, Otto previously worked with The Observer Newspaper from 2012 to 2013 and later the Institute for War and Peace Reporting IWPR based in Gulu.

He was the URN Gulu bureau chief 2014-2016.