Gov't Renews Amnesty Commission Mandate

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In short
Justice Peter Onega, the chairman of Amnesty Commission says the mandate has been extended to allow the commission to engage in the reintegration of former Lords Resistance Army LRA abductees in Northern Uganda.

The government has renewed the mandate of the Amnesty Commission for another year.

Justice Peter Onega, the chairman of Amnesty Commission says the mandate has been extended to allow the commission to engage in the reintegration of former Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) abductees in Northern Uganda.

Justice Onega, who is Gulu district to consult on the economic situation and livelihood needs of the former abductees, told journalists at Northern Uganda Media Club that the government has disbursed 4.5 billion Shillings to facilitate the reintegration efforts of former combatants of the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA).
 
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Justice Onega says while the commission has granted Amnesty certificates to 27,300 reporters since the Amnesty Act was enacted in 2000, only 9,414 former combatants who renounced rebellion against the government of Uganda from the different rebel groups have been reintegrated.
 
He says the commission will now give those inserted into their communities' fresh sources of livelihood to help them recover economically.
 
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Sister Mary Okee, the Amnesty Commission Demobilization and Reintegration Team Leader for Gulu Regional Office says the economic situation of resettled former combatants of the Lord's Resistance Army remains dire in communities. Most of them are suffering from stigmatization and untreated trauma, she said.
 
Moses Draku, the Public Relations Officer of the Amnesty Commission says more than 6,000 of the beneficiaries are women while more than 13,650 are former Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) abductees. Draku says the commission has only reinserted 21,185 former combatants. 

 

Mentioned: amnesty commission

About the author

Peter Labeja
Peter Labeja has been a practicing journalist for the last 13 years during which he has covered part of the brutal conflict which bedeviled Northern Uganda as well as the painful transition to Peace thereafter. Emerging post conflict issues such as land rights of under privileged widows and orphans, challenges of access to social services in the immediate aftermath of Lord’s Resistance Army conflict in Northern Uganda.

Labeja is now the Northern Uganda Bureau chief in Acholi Sub Region since 2014 - Gulu, Amuru, Nwoya and Omoro districts as well as South Sudan falls within his areas of jurisdiction. He previously worked with The Vision Group for four years.

Labeja’s major career interests are in Climate Change; Agriculture and Environment - natural resources such as Water, Oil and Gas; Transitional Justice; Human Rights, Democracy and Governance as well as South Sudan’s humanitarian crisis. In 2013, Labeja was awarded a prestigious Pan African Journalism Award for excellence in journalism at United Nation’s UNEP headquarters in Nairobi, Kenya for Climate Change and Health Reporting.