Gulu Rejects 22 Youth Livelihood Project Applications

3140 Views Gulu, Uganda

In short
Martin Ojara Mapenduzi, the Gulu district chairperson says that many of the applicants reviewed through the last one week lacked guidance, proper documentation and viability. Most of the deferred projects were in the areas of computer training, provision of loan schemes and long term agricultural programs.

Gulu district has rejected project proposals of 22 youth groups that intended to benefit from the Youth livelihood fund, saying that the submissions were not viable.

The Youth Livelihood fund is the latest government initiative to address the challenge of unemployment in Uganda. With an initial budget of Shs 256 billion over the next five years, the program seeks to equip youth between 18-30 years with skills and start-up capital to enable them effectively participate in National development and improve their quality of life.

Gulu district received shs 389million to be able to share it among successful youth groups at sub county level. Successful applicants receive funds between shs 5-8million each to implement the envisaged projects.

So far 36 youth groups have succeeded with projects such as grinding and milling, Agribusiness, piggery, and agriculture among others. Most of the successful projects were from the Sub counties of Bungatira and Koro which had up to six successful applications each.

Martin Ojara Mapenduzi, the Gulu district chairperson says that many of the applicants reviewed through the last one week lacked guidance, proper documentation and viability. Most of the deferred projects were in the areas of computer training, provision of loan schemes and long term agricultural programs.

Mapenduzi however says the youth still have an opportunity to revisit their projects and write more viable plans that can provide return on investments.

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The district is now left with shs 107million to be shared among youth groups which will be able to present convincing applications. Mapenduzi encouraged more youth groups especially from the Sub Counties of Odek and Patiko, with limited approvals, to apply for the funding.

The sub counties have now been given three weeks to work on viable projects.

Robert Komakech, the Gulu district youth council chairperson told URN that some of the applicants lacked land titles and agreements, yet their projects include agricultural practices like animal traction and farming.

Robert Otim, a youth from one of the groups whose proposals were rejected told URN that the youths need to be guided and trained on selecting and identifying projects that can be successful.

 

About the author

Alex Otto
“Journalism that changes lives is my goal,” Alex Otto has said on more than one occasion. That is his career’s guiding principle. Has been since he was a radio journalist in the northern Ugandan town of Gulu in 2009.

Otto passionately believes his journalism should bring to the fore the voices of the voiceless like the shooting victims of Apaa. Otto tries in his journalism to ask tough questions to those in positions of authority.

Based in the Kampala bureau, Otto is especially interested in covering agriculture, politics, education, human rights, crime, environment and business. He has reported intensively on the post-conflict situation in northern Uganda.

A URN staff member since 2014, Otto previously worked with The Observer Newspaper from 2012 to 2013 and later the Institute for War and Peace Reporting IWPR based in Gulu.

He was the URN Gulu bureau chief 2014-2016.