Gulu University Grappling with Staffing, Infrastructure Challenges

3028 Views

In short
According to the University's Deputy vice Chancellor Professor Callistus Baliddawa, the university target was to enroll 5000 students in the first 5 years and up to 1000 students in the first 10 years of existence. However in the past the student population has stagnated between 3000-4000.

Gulu University has failed to meet its target of having at least 5000 students join the University after every five years as a result of limited infrastructure and lack of accommodation facilities.

The University which was established in 2002 in the former Gulu district farm institute now has a population of 4000 students.

According to the University's deputy vice Chancellor Professor Callistus Baliddawa, the university target was to enroll 5000 students in the first 5 years and up to 1000 students in the first 10 years of existence. However in the past the student population has stagnated between 3000-4000.
 
Baliddawa attributes this challenge to limited infrastructure at the university.
 
He says the University is currently moving on cautiously because enrolling as earlier planned could cripple standards and service delivery.

//Cue in: “we have been moving…………
Cue out: ……..been keeping it low”//

Andrew Ogwetta Otto, the Guild president Gulu University states that even with the current number of students at the University, the situation is still alarming with poor facilities, limited study space for joint lectures and broken furniture.
 
The most affected faculty is that of Education whose construction is reported to be unsuitable for lecture rooms. 

Another challenge however is that Gulu University cannot implement all its academic programs because of inadequate staffing as 62 percent of the approved academic staff positions remain vacant.

 

About the author

Alex Otto
“Journalism that changes lives is my goal,” Alex Otto has said on more than one occasion. That is his career’s guiding principle. Has been since he was a radio journalist in the northern Ugandan town of Gulu in 2009.

Otto passionately believes his journalism should bring to the fore the voices of the voiceless like the shooting victims of Apaa. Otto tries in his journalism to ask tough questions to those in positions of authority.

Based in the Kampala bureau, Otto is especially interested in covering agriculture, politics, education, human rights, crime, environment and business. He has reported intensively on the post-conflict situation in northern Uganda.

A URN staff member since 2014, Otto previously worked with The Observer Newspaper from 2012 to 2013 and later the Institute for War and Peace Reporting IWPR based in Gulu.

He was the URN Gulu bureau chief 2014-2016.