Health Officials Destroy 13,000 Litres of Suspicious Beverage

1832 Views Arua, Uganda

In short
Norah Fuathum, the Arua Municipal Health Inspector, says they confiscated the beverage because they found it being produced in a very unhygienic environment.

 Health officials in Arua Municipality have destroyed 13,000 liters of a suspicious beverage code named "Stamina Champagne" for fear that it could be harmful for human consumption. 



The officials found the drink being processed in an incomplete and untidy building in Adriko Cell in Arua Municipality. Three suspects were arrested in the raid on the facility for questioning and were released on police bond. They are Moses Mukamuhebwa, Valence Maniragaba and Michael Izabayo. 



In February, Arua Municipal council advised the trio to certify their beverage and find suitable premises for their operations, in vain. According to the label on the package of the drink, Stamina Champagne is a concoction of mushrooms, fungus tea, honey, grapes, sugar, water and honey.  



The label also shows that Stamina Champagne is an immune booster and used for sexual manpower. Norah Fuathum, the Arua Municipal Health Inspector, says they confiscated the beverage because they found it being produced in a very unhygienic environment.
 
 
//Cue in: ‘Even if Uganda…
Cue out: …the people here.'//
 
 
Fuathum warns residents against consuming beverages that are not certified by UNBS, saying they could be harmful.  




Innocent Dusabe, the Officer In-charge of the Criminal Intelligence Department at Arua Central Police station, says they have dispatched a sample of the finished beverage to Uganda National Bureau of Standards for examination.
 
 
Reports show that Stamina Champagne enjoys a huge market in the Democratic Republic of Congo and supermarkets in Arua district. 
 

 

About the author

Annet Lekuru
Annet Lekuru is the Uganda Radio Network bureau chief for Arua. She is new in this post, assigned August 2016. However, she is no stranger to URN subcribers and readers.

Lekuru started her journalism career in 2011 with training from Radio Paris where she worked until April 2015. She started writing for URN in May 2015 as a freelance reporter.

Lekuru loves and continues to admire URN because of the reporter privilege to identify and report on issues close to one's heart which offers an opportunity to the reporter to develop a passion in a beat and report on it exhaustively.

With a background training in Conflict Sensitive Journalism she hopes to graduate into doing remarkable and recognised human rights and human interest stories in the near future.

She is interested in reporting on issues of justice, law, human rights and health.