High Court Criminal Session Kicks Off in Kiboga

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In short
Gladys Nakibuule, the Nakawa high court registrar says the criminal session, which is presided over by Justice Wilson Musene Masalu is to last for a month and ten days is expected to address the case backlog.

Nakawa High court has kicked off a criminal session for Kiboga magisterial area to handle more than 50 cases. Gladys Nakibuule, the Nakawa high court registrar says the criminal session, which is presided over by Justice Wilson Musene Masalu is to last for a month and ten days is expected to address the case backlog.
 
She says the session will focus on suspects who have been on remand since 2008 and 2014. Nakibuule says the suspects are accused amongst crimes murder, rape, aggravated defilement, simple defilement and high way robbery.
 
 
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While opening the session Justice Wilson Musene Musalu, noted that some of the suspects have been on remand for more than 6 years, which violated their constitutional right to a speedy trial. He said it its judgement court would take into consideration the time the suspects has spent on remand.
 
Musene stressed that the judiciary was still committed to ensuring that every Ugandan gets proper justice despite challenges.
 
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 Joseph Kule Muranga, the Kiboga Resident District Commissioner welcomed the opening of the court session and decried the rampant defilement in the district. He said older men opt for young girls with the false believe that are older women are infected with HIV/Aids.
 
 
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Israel Yiga, the Kiboga LCV chairperson said the judiciary has of late played a great role in curbing capital offences such as aggravated defilement, rape, murder, high way robbery among others.
 
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The problem of case backlog is common in the Ugandan judiciary due to inadequate number of staffing despite several attempts to address the problem.