Kabarole Home Improvement Campaign Registers Success

2600 Views Fort Portal, Uganda

In short
Olive Tumuhairwe, the health inspector in-charge Burahya County, says that in a bid to motivate other households to improve their sanitation, they give out incentives, which include mosquito nets, soap and tippy taps to households who have excelled in hygiene and sanitation.

A campaign aimed at improving hygiene and sanitation in homes has registered success in Kabarole district. In 2014, Kabarole district launched the home improvement campaign to address the poor sanitation in Rwimi and Bukuku sub counties.

 
The authorities were prompted to launch the campaign, following the repeated outbreak of sanitation-related diseases such as cholera, diarrhea and typhoid. Under the campaign, each home was required to put up a latrine and hand washing facilities with tippy taps and soap.



Two years later, the situation has improved tremendously. In Kajumiro A village, Rwimi Sub County, a survey done by Uganda Radio Network shows that each home has a latrine unlike in the past when more than 20 families shared one pit latrine, leading to open defecation.

 
Tippy taps and soap used for hand washing are also fixed at the latrines. Records from Kakinga Health Centre III, Rwimi Sub County indicate that the center has not received patients suffering from typhoid or diarrhea for the past eight months.  

George Baguma, a resident of Kajumiro A Village says the campaign has helped to enhance sanitation and hygiene standards in the area. He explains that access routes in the area were in the past filthy, filled with persistent smell of urine and human excreta, but this is no more.
 
Faith Nuwagaba, another resident says that open defecation posed problems to human health and to the environment in areas where people eliminated waste in close proximity to homesteads. She adds that there has been a sharp decline in diarrhea and cholera in the area for the past one year. 


//Cue in: "many diseases."//
Cue out: "…defecate everywhere."//
 
Steven Mugabe, the Rwimi Sub County Chief, attributes the success of the campaign to constant home visits by village health teams and health inspectors.

//Cue in: "VHTs hard working…
Cue out: "…minimum requirements."//
 
Olive Tumuhairwe, the health inspector in-charge Burahya County, says that in a bid to motivate other households to improve their sanitation, they give out incentives, which include mosquito nets, soap and tippy taps to households who have excelled in hygiene and sanitation.


Tumuhairwe adds that they are also trying to sensitize residents on the advantages of having pit latrines.


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A World Bank report issued last year shows that at least 3.2 million Ugandans have no latrines at all and their place of convenience is the open space. The report also notes that poor sanitation costs Uganda approximately 389 Billion Shillings each year, a sum equivalent to 15, 000Shillings or 1.1 per cent of the national Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

 

About the author

Emmanuel Kajubu
Emmanuel Kajubu is proud to have been the first Ugandan journalist to write in depth pieces about the Tooro Kingdom institution. His knowledge of the inner workings of the Tooro Kingdom is what made him privy to the splits in the royal family. These splits almost challenged Tooro Omukama Oyo Nyimba Iguru's reign.

Culture, agriculture and the environment are just two areas of many of interest to Kajubu. As long as he has held a pen, Kajubu has also written about public policy, health and crime.

Kajubu is keen on impacting his society not just as a writer but also a trainer and mentor. Bundibugyo and Ntoroko districts fall under his docket. Kajubu has been a URN staff member since 2008.