How Makerere Bakery Turned Into Police Quarters

2073 Views Kampala, Uganda

In short
Between 1992 and 2014, Ugandas oldest university made its own bread from its own bakery and distributed it to staff and students in different halls of residence. At its peak, the bakery produced 1,500 loaves of bread per day.

The building that once housed Makerere University Bakery has been turned into quarters for police officers.
 
Between 1992 and 2014, Uganda's oldest university made its own bread from its own bakery and distributed it to staff and students in different halls of residence. At its peak, the bakery produced 1,500 loaves of bread per day.
  
In August 2014, the bakery was among a number of units closed by the university after it outsourced meals in the halls of residence. Also closed was a maize mill which produced wheat and other flour.
 
The facility is now housing police officers and men from the nearby Makerere University Police Post. This after Makerere University management gave the police a go ahead to occupy the building in 2014.
  
A Uganda Radio Network reporter visited the once vibrant bakery and brings you a story of the dilapidated and abandoned structures.
  
The building now has temporary structures for security officials, deserted receipt books, dusty bread pans and trays all lying deserted in the mesh cages. The bakery, next to Africa and Livingstone halls, has seen better days.
 
One of the former workers, who did not want to be named, lamented that the bakery is now a barracks.
 
Standing and gazing at the formerly functioning machines but now defunct, the former worker said: "Look at the mixer; they took away its switches."
 
Its closure and left workers equally deserted and the facility remained idle as the university halted producing bread.
 
The chief security officer of Makerere University, Jackson Mucunguzi, confirms that both the maize mill and the bakery are being occupied by his men and says they can leave anytime the university wants to use the facility.
 
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According to Musa Kwezi, a former employee, the decision to establish a bakery and maize mill was reached in a meeting of all hall wardens summoned by the then dean of students Mr. George Kihuguru. This was after complaints from students that the university was serving them poor quality posho and bread.
 
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Formerly, the university depended on private suppliers who would sometimes distribute poor quality maize flour and bread. The solution and the resolution were buying their own maize mill, produce good quality posho.
 
Kwezi says the university produced oval bread which would be sliced to serve students in the halls of residence and staff living within the university.
 
Kwezi says that at the time of its closure, the bakery had reached a capacity of producing at least 1,500 loaves of bread branded 'Versity Bread' which was sold in the canteens and in other areas in Kampala.
 
About 11 workers including store keepers, chief bakers, security guards and machine operators were employed in the bakery.
 
The university has since neither terminated their services nor allocated them new work places. Because of spending a lot of time minus work, Kwezi says that most of them have been thrown out of the houses they were renting.
 
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