I Did Not Abandon My Husband - Justice Jane Kiggundu

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Justice Jane Kiggundu, former Kyotera MP wife addressing mourners Edward Bindhe

Justice Jane Kiggundu, former Kyotera MP wife addressing mourners Login to license this image from 1$.

In short
Justice Jane Kiggundu of the High Court has confessed to mourners how she left her husband Patrick Kiggundu, the former Kyotera Member of Parliament, after a nasty accident which left him crippled and incapacitated. Patrick Kiggundu, also a former Corporation Secretary at the New Vision, died on Friday after spending 15 years bedridden following the nasty accident in June 1998.

Justice Jane Kiggundu of the High Court has confessed to mourners how she left her husband Patrick Kiggundu, the former Kyotera Member of Parliament, after a nasty accident which left him crippled and incapacitated.

Patrick Kiggundu, also a former Corporation Secretary at the New Vision, died on Friday after spending 15 years bedridden following the nasty accident he was involved in Lwera along Masaka-Kampala Highway in June 1998. At the time of the accident, according to JB Kakooza, his close friend, Kiggundu was travelling to Kampala and then Entebbe Airport to catch a flight to London for a conference.

Kiggundu, who had spent two years in Parliament representing Kyotera, sustained serious head injuries. Dr. Jimmy Ssekitoleko, his young brother says Kiggundu’s brain was so damaged that several of the tissues were tampered with and this affected his memory. According to Dr. Ssekitoleko, after several weeks in intensive care at Mulago Hospital he decided to take him to his home in Bwala Hill, Masaka Municipality and started treating him personally.

Kiggundu remained paralyzed and confined to a wheelchair for 15 years. He also suffered diabetes until last week when he died.

Patrick Kiggundu married Jane Kiggundu in 1988. But Jane Kiggundu left him a year after the accident and disappeared to Kampala.

For the first time since leaving their marital home with her three children in 1999, Justice Kiggundu returned to Botera village near Kalisizo town council where her husband was buried on Sunday. Justice Kiggundu told mourners that so many things had been said about her marriage and she wanted to set the record clear.

Flanked by her three daughters, the judge said she decided to leave her husband and go look for money to take care of the children. She explained that by the time her husband got an accident, she did not have a decent job and she suffered a lot looking for money to educate their children.


Lady Justice Kiggundu said as a result, she decided to consult both her parents in Mbarara and Kiggundu’s family members in Botera, who approved her leaving since their bread winner had been rendered incapacitated affecting their income. She adds that it was after appointing her a judge by President Yoweri Museveni that life improved and managed to educate her children who have now graduated.


Maria Nagawa, one of the late Kiggundu’s daughters, said they loved their dad despite staying away from him for a long time. She told mourners that although they now stay in the United States where they are pursuing different courses, they used to write to the father and they prayed for his recovery.
Nagawa said they will miss their father because they have not really met and talked to him in a long time until his death.

//Cue in: “All we have…
Cue out: …us his children.”//
 
Kyotera County MP Haruna Kasolo said Kiggundu died a disappointed man after the accident. He claimed that the accident left his family divided which created a lot of confusion even after the death. He said that although they wanted Parliament to convene and recognize Kiggundu’s contribution, his family blocked the move.

//Cue in: “The Family did…
Cue out: …that is Patrick Kiggundu.”//

President Yoweri Museveni contributed 15 million shillings towards Kiggundu’s burial on Sunday.

 

About the author

Edward Bindhe
Bindhe prides himself on being a part of the society he writes about. He believes there is no way a journalist can understand his society unless it considers him a part of it. This is why he is dedicated to investigating the challenges of the "little person."

Bindhe says, "My work reflects the Uganda Radio Network unique approach to news." Not many Ugandan journalists would consider or even notice the re-emergence of Water Hyacinth on a lake. Bindhe does.

Truant children will attract Bindhe's attention until he gets to the bottom of their truancy: poverty and the need to work to earn bread for their families. These are the kinds of stories Bindhe is often after.

Edward Bindhe is the Masaka URN bureau chief. Rakai, Lwengo, Lyantonde, Kalangala, Mpigi, Kalungu, Bukomansimbi and Sembabule districts fall under his docket. He has been a URN staff member since 2009.

A Mass Communication graduate from Uganda Christian University, Bindhe started practising journalism in 2008 as a reporter for Radio Buddu in Masaka district.

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