Inside Ongwen's Charges

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In short
The ICC prosecutors talk of pillaging, cruel torture, enslavement and killing among the eminently referred to crimes committed by Ongwen in Pajule and Odek camps. They say at least 61 camp dwellers in Odek including the elderly persons and heavily pregnant women were short dead under the direct command of Ongwen in March 2004. During the attacks 35 civilians including eight girls were abducted.

Prosecutors have explained the magnitude of Dominic Ongwen's involvement, active participation and control of his subordinates in carrying out successful attacks on civilian population in northern Uganda.
  
They talk of pillaging, cruel torture, enslavement and killing among the eminently referred to crimes committed by Ongwen in Pajule and Odek camps.                        
  
Prosecution alleges that at least 61 camp dwellers in Odek including the elderly persons and heavily pregnant women were short dead under the direct command of Ongwen in March 2004.

During the attacks, according to the prosecutors, 35 civilians including eight girls were abducted.

Internal Security Organization (ISO) logbooks containing inscriptions recorded from LRA radio communications, photographs and oral accounts from witnesses, abductees and former LRA commanders among others form the core of evidence prosecutors have tabled before ICC judges. 

As a top Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) commander, Ongwen, now on trial at the International Criminal Court, allegedly carried out attacks on internally displaced people's camps in Odek, Lukodi, Lapul and Abok areas in Gulu, Amuru and Oyam districts respectively.
  
The prosecutors say that by 2004, Ongwen was the only senior commander of the LRA left behind when troops loyal to Kony retreated to South Sudan. That he issued orders to his subordinates to kill anyone who attempted to escape or declined to obey his orders.
  
Prosecution further told the Hague-based court that Ongwen enjoyed rapid promotion in the LRA ranks between 2002 and 2005 because he carried out successful attacks and impressed his boss, Joseph Kony.
  
They further submitted that Kony promoted Ongwen from Captain to Brigadier within two and a half years owing to his effective attacks. That, according to prosecution, earned Ongwen favour where he was described as exemplary and reliable, something that subordinates to Ongwen who are to testify will attest to.
  
The prosecutors led by Fatou Bensouda pointed out areas in which Ongwen prominently relayed orders from Kony and killed civilians in communities like Odek, Lagile, Abok and Lukode among others for opposing LRA and siding with the Museveni government.
  
Earlier, the same prosecutors acknowledged that Ongwen is a former abductee who was conscripted into the ranks of the rebel Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) as a child. They, however, told judges that this would not exonerate him from prosecution.
  
They argued that Ongwen, now in his 40s, rose through the LRA ranks and became one of the most senior commanders, a position he could have exploited to denounce rebellion.
  
"The evidence shows that Dominic Ongwen was a murderer and a rapist," submitted Bensouda as Ongwen's long awaited trial for war crimes and crimes against humanity started today.
  
The prosecutors said they have sufficient evidence, including voice recordings from radio communications, which implicate Ongwen for crimes he committed in four different internally displaced people's camps in Northern Uganda.                 

Ongwen faces 70 counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity allegedly committed in the four case areas between 2002 and 2005.