International Media Dominance Threatens Local Outlets –Expert

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In short
Pompigne says Media outlets across Africa need to invest more in producing content, in order to counter the force of international conglomerates that are ambitiously investing in Africa, targeting African audiences and competing for African airwaves.

Competition from Western and Asian media outlets could affect the survival of indigenous media houses in Africa, according to Nicolas Pompigne-Mognard, the founder of media relations consultancy firm, APO Group.  




Pompigne says Media outlets across Africa need to invest more in producing content, in order to counter the force of international conglomerates that are ambitiously investing in Africa, targeting African audiences and competing for African airwaves.    





He was making reference to the dominance of media houses like Chinese CTGN (China Global Television Network), into a market which was formerly controlled by CNN, BBC and Deutsche Welle (DW).   





He argues that while the emergence of such media houses offers diversity to listeners, viewers and readers, it comes with competition to the locally founded media houses adding that the trend should worry media owners in Africa.   





Pompigne, a Franco-Gabonese former journalist says one of the major underlying challenges of African media outlets is content adding that African media must find a way to make its content more attractive to its audiences.   



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Pompigne, who is visiting Africa's major journalism training institutions, further argues that the trend is going to impact revenues to local outlets as multinational advertising companies opt for international media outlets. This, he argues is likely to affect talent development and the capacity of indigenous outlets to compete for the same audience.   



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Dr Fred Kakooza, a Multimedia production expert and lecturer at the Makerere University Department of Journalism equally acknowledges that Uganda's media lacks quality content.  He also raises fears of regulation that sometimes push local media into self-regulation and give a blind eye to content that engages the population especially on governance issues which an international media will gladly air.  





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Dr Kakooza, however, states that local media houses still have an edge over international media in terms of proximity. He contends also that even stories told by natives on international media are better told than the foreign press. 

 

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Dr Sarah Namusoga, a mass communication lecturer at Makerere University demands more emphasis on access to enable people to access local content.     





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About the author

Davidson Ndyabahika
Davidson Ndyabahika is a Journalism major from Makerere University and is passionate about investigative and data journalism with special interest in feature story telling.

He has gone through digital and multi-media training both at Ultimate Multimedia Consult, and has attended Data Journalism Sessions at ACME to enrich his capacity in data journalism.

Davidson has previously freelanced with The Campus Times, The Observer, Chimp reports and URN. He is currently reporting under Education. He is also passionate about reporting on environment, health, crime and political satire writing.

Follow him on Twitter: @dndyaba