Kabale Municipality Hit By Water Shortage, 8 Schools Affected

2199 Views Kabale, Western Region, Uganda

In short
A water shortage has hit Southern Division in Kabale Municipality after Nyangorogoro Gravity Flow Scheme stopped distributing water to schools and people’s homes. At least 200 families and eight schools with a population of over 3,000 students are affected by the break-down of the water scheme, with many of them resorting to using unclean stream water.

A water shortage has hit Southern Division in Kabale Municipality after Nyangorogoro gravity flow scheme stopped distributing water to schools and people’s homes.
 
The gravity flow scheme is said to have been constructed by UNICEF in the 1960s and has never been rehabilitated by either the Municipality or the local government.
 
At least 200 families and eight schools with a population of over 3,000 students are affected by the break-down of the water scheme, with many of them resorting to using unclean stream water.
 
The most affected areas include Mwanjari and Karubanda Wards, areas of Nyangorogoro, Nyakakiika Ahabuhasya, Kazigyizigyi, Nyakambu and Kamukiira. In Mwanjari and Karubanda wards alone, at least 120 families are affected by the water crisis.

The schools affected include St. Mary’s College Rushoroza, St. Maria Gorreti Primary and Secondary Schools, St. Paul’s Seminary, St. Thereza Secondary School and Uganda Martyrs University Kabale Study Centre among others.

Vanansio Gubazire, a resident of Karubanda in Southern Division, says the gravity flow scheme was constructed in 1966 and that the metallic pipes which were used have been rotting away. Some of the pipes were vandalized by unknown people, believed to be metal scrap dealers.

Gubazire says the sorry state of the scheme has been worsened by failure by Kabale Municipality to rehabilitate it until recently when the taps dried up.
 
Scholastica Nkeramugabo, the female councilor for Karubanda Ward says the water shortage has resulted into serious consequences especially on the side of Women and children. She says the children have to trek long distances in search of water before they go to school.
 
She says the biggest challenge is that the Municipal authorities say there is no budget for working on the Water scheme.

Alex Muhserure, a resident of Mwanjari in Southern Division, Kabale Municipality, says locals have to pay 1000 shillings for a 20-litre jerrycan of water of water, as most of the areas are not covered by the metered water supplied by the National Water and Sewerage Corporation.
 
Elijah Betunga, the Vice chairperson for Kabale Slum Dwellers Association, says that the association is yet to visit the scheme to assess the magnitude of the problem.
 
He says the locals in the area have already written to the association’s top leadership to have the scheme worked on.

Betunga says those who cannot afford metered water are resorting to using unclean water.

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Kabale Mayor Dr. Pius Ruhemurana says the Municipality will work closely with the slum dwellers association to put water back. He says there is a fund that was set aside by slum dwellers association and that his office will work with their leadership, but he never specified how soon it will be done.
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About the author

Anthony Kushaba
For Anthony Kushaba, journalism is not just a job; it is a calling. Kushaba believes journalism is one of the few platforms where the views of the oppressed and margainalised can be heard. This is what his journalism aims to do: bring to light untold stories.

Kushaba is the Mbarara region URN bureau chief. Mitooma, Ntungamo, Bushenyi, Sheema, Isingiro, and Kiruhura districts fall under his docket. Kushaba has been a URN staff member since 2012.

Kushaba is a journalism graduate from Uganda Christian University Study Centre at Bishop Barham College in Kabale. Before joining URN, Kushaba worked with Voice of Kigezi (2008), Bushenyi FM (2010) and later on to Voice of Muhabura.

Kushaba's journalism interests centre on conflict, peace and electoral reporting. Kushaba occasionally writes on tourism, health, religion and education. He describes himself as highly driven and will pursue a tip until it yields a story.