Karimojong Street Girls Relocate To Nairobi

4027 Views Napak, Uganda

In short
Linos Lokorwa, the Napak District LC V Vice chairperson says he recently learnt that Karimojong children are now heading to the neighboring Kenya to work mostly in Somali homes.

Karamojong street children especially girls are now finding their way to Kenya's capital Nairobi.

Information obtained by URN from sources, girls aged between 10 to 20 years are relocating to Nairobi through their local networks.

Some Kenyans ferrying the girls to Kenya smuggled them out through the Malaba and Busia border points. Several girls have settled in Eastleigh estate where they are serving temporarily as house help while others roam the streets of Nairobi and slums in search of jobs.
 
Linos Lokorwa, the Napak District LC V Vice chairperson says he recently learnt that Karimojong children are now heading to the neighboring Kenya to work mostly in Somali homes. He says available information shows that, the girls are paid hefty sums of money by their employers.

//cue in:  "Out migration,
Cue out:  on the street".

Helen Pulkol, an LC V councilor says villages are now scattered and almost deserted with only the elderly left behind.

//cue in: "The problem,
Cue out: ..no voice".//

Paul Lobucie, the LC 3 Chairperson Lokopo Sub County says his area is one of the most affected.

//cue in:  "My Sub County,
Cue out:  .carry a girl."//

Thereza Mudong, a former social worker who was charged with resettling returnees from streets  in Kampala five years ago wonders why migrations are worsening in Napak. She calls on leaders to find strategies that can deter children from going to streets.

At least 500 children including parents have been returned from Kampala streets in the last five years in Karamoja. 

 

About the author

Olandason Wanyama
Olandason Wanyama is the Karamoja region bureau chief. Amudat, Nakapiripirit, Moroto, Abim, Kotido and Kaabong districts fall under his docket. Wanyama has been a URN staff member since 2012.

The former teacher boasts of 20 years journalism experience. Wanyama started out as a freelance writer for the Daily Monitor newspaper in 1991 in Entebbe. Wanyama also wrote for the army publication Tarehe Sita, the Uganda National Roads Authority (UNRA) magazine and The New Vision. While not on the beat, Wanyama taught child soldiers at Uganda Airforce School-Katabi.

Wanyama is very interested in conflict reporting, climate change, education, health and business reporting. He is also an avid photographic chronicler of vanishing tribal life in the East African region.