Kayihura Pledges Affirmative Action for Women

1226 Views Kampala, Uganda

In short
According to Kayihura, currently women comprise 20 percent of the total police population in the country although the law provides for 30 percent.

The Inspector of Police General Kale Kayihura has pledged to increase the number of women in the police force. According to Kayihura, currently women comprise 20 percent of the total police population in the country although the law provides for 30 percent.

 
He argues that women are more of problem solvers than criminals based on the current crime statistics. Kayihura wants different sectors and organisations to employ more women to harness their potential.
 

//Cue in: "To empower women...
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Kayihura was speaking at the Kigali International Conference Declaration General Assembly held in Serena hotel in Kampala under the theme "Combating violence against women and girls: The roles of security organs and the community."
 
 
He noted that women the majority and are also the most positive members of society, which makes them national assets. Kayihura decried the high number of defilement cases, which he said remains a challenge in the country.
 

He called for a joint effort to curb the vice and asked government not to abandon it for Non-Governmental Organisations. Kayiruha disclosed that Police is working on elevating the family and child protection unit, so that victims of the gender based violence can be protected.

 
He says the department still faces a lot of challenges like funding for medical checkups in cases of gender based violence. He also called for the establishment of an African criminal data center that will curb modern slavery of girls.

 
He states that as it stands, criminals who commit crime in their countries run away and end up committing similar crimes abroad, stating that a data center on criminals will help. 
 

 

About the author

Alex Otto
“Journalism that changes lives is my goal,” Alex Otto has said on more than one occasion. That is his career’s guiding principle. Has been since he was a radio journalist in the northern Ugandan town of Gulu in 2009.

Otto passionately believes his journalism should bring to the fore the voices of the voiceless like the shooting victims of Apaa. Otto tries in his journalism to ask tough questions to those in positions of authority.

Based in the Kampala bureau, Otto is especially interested in covering agriculture, politics, education, human rights, crime, environment and business. He has reported intensively on the post-conflict situation in northern Uganda.

A URN staff member since 2014, Otto previously worked with The Observer Newspaper from 2012 to 2013 and later the Institute for War and Peace Reporting IWPR based in Gulu.

He was the URN Gulu bureau chief 2014-2016.