Kenyan National Jailed 37 years for Murder Top story

1771 Views Moroto, Uganda

In short
Bernard Marunda alias Mohamed Ekapalatan was convicted for killing a bodaboda cyclist Siraje Wambede over five years ago.

Moroto High court has sentenced to 37 years in jail, a Kenyan national Bernard Marunda, who was found guilty of murder and aggravated robbery.

Murunda, also known as Mohamed Ekapalatan was convicted for killing Siraje Wambede, a bodaboda cyclist in Moroto district five years ago.

Prosecution led by Gerald Amalo Peter told court that Marunda, and another still at large, on March 25, 2011 at Nakiloro village in Moroto district, disguised as passengers to murder Siraje Wambede and robbed him of a motorbike registration number UDR 235c, a Nokia phone 5130 and 18,000 Uganda Shillings.
 
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Marunda pleaded guilty after the state produced six witnesses to pin him. He had earlier denied the charges. However, Marunda declined to plead for leniency  saying he had left the matter in God's hands.

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Presiding Judge Henrietta Wolayo said Marunda denied the deceased a right to life through his actions.
 
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Zaitun Namono, a mother to the deceased said the sentence said it was insufficient.
 
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About the author

Olandason Wanyama
Olandason Wanyama is the Karamoja region bureau chief. Amudat, Nakapiripirit, Moroto, Abim, Kotido and Kaabong districts fall under his docket. Wanyama has been a URN staff member since 2012.

The former teacher boasts of 20 years journalism experience. Wanyama started out as a freelance writer for the Daily Monitor newspaper in 1991 in Entebbe. Wanyama also wrote for the army publication Tarehe Sita, the Uganda National Roads Authority (UNRA) magazine and The New Vision. While not on the beat, Wanyama taught child soldiers at Uganda Airforce School-Katabi.

Wanyama is very interested in conflict reporting, climate change, education, health and business reporting. He is also an avid photographic chronicler of vanishing tribal life in the East African region.