Lira School Closed Over Congestion

4218 Views Lira, Uganda

In short
King James Comprehensive School, a Lira based private secondary school has been closed on the orders of the District Education Committee, a day after students went on strike.

King James Comprehensive School, a Lira based private secondary school has been closed on the orders of the District Education Committee, a day after students went on strike.

On Monday, the school authorities suspended over 800 students accusing them of planning a violent strike a day before. But in the evening of the same day, Lira Resident District Commissioner, Susan Akany led a team of education experts in an attempt to take the students back to school.

After their suspension, students demonstrated to all the district offices accusing the school administrators of failing to provide them food for the past two weeks. They were complaining of poor teaching saying lessons were not going on and that whenever they try to complain, they are rewarded with suspensions.

RDC Akany said the school authorities suspended the children as a cover up on what she called huge indisputable at the school.

Akany said the students stormed her office and demanded for her intervention by taking them back to the school.
She noted that vital facilities including toilets and accommodation are all in a sorry state. The RDC noted that toilets at the school are full and in one dormitory, six students were sharing a bed.  

King James Comprehensive School has a population of over 2000 students.

The District Education Officer, George Milton Abua, noted that the school was running four complete schools in one.
Abua noted that the administrators need to scale down on their admission or even disperse some of the students to other schools.

Bosco Bwonyo, the district inspector of schools described the situation at King James Comprehensive School as pathetic. He explained that teachers do not have evidence to show that they are teaching and they failed to produce lesson plans and schemes of work.

Bwonyo said they closed the school in good faith, adding that teachers’ assignment across all classes was not consistent with curriculum requirements.

But the school director, Dickson Odongo, said closing his school was in bad faith, adding that the act protected students who had misbehaved.

The vice chairman LC5, Andrew Ogwang Oyang, said that two weeks earlier he had also received complaints from parents that their children were being mistreated.

Ogwang said he had already directed the chairman of the education committee to summon the school head teacher and the director before the committee to respond to the complaints.