Health Ministry Rolls Out Mass Vaccination Against Human Papiloma Virus

1836 Views Kasese, Uganda

In short
According to Health Minister, Dr. Elioda Tumwesigye, 300 out of every 100,000 women in Uganda have cervical cancer, whose prevalence increases by 5 percent each year.

The Health Ministry has rolled out the mass immunisation against Human Papiloma Virus for young girls between 10 and 13 years of age. The Human Papiloma Virus causes cervical cancer.  

Health Minister, Dr. Elioda Tumwesigye launched the mass immunisation drive at Bwera Secondary School Playground in Kasese district on Tuesday. 

//Cue in: "On behalf of ..........................Cue out: ......................or both."//

The minister vaccinated 11-year-old Angella Masika ,as a sign of flagging off the program.  At least six hundred school girls aged between 10 and 13 years were vaccinated at the launch. Under the program, girls between 10 and 13-years of age will receive two doses within six months to protect them from the sexually transmitted Human Papiloma Virus.

 
According to Tumwesigye, 300 out of every 100,000 women in Uganda have cervical cancer, whose prevalence increases by 5 percent each year. He warned teenage girls and women above the vaccinate age to embrace cervical screening saying the disease takes between 15 and 20 years to show symptoms. Tumwesigye called upon married couples to stick to their partners if the virus is to be contained.

 
Dr. Jane Ruth Acheng, the Director General of Health Services warned medical workers against asking for money when immunising the girls and theft of the vaccines. 

Acheng asked parents to cooperate with the medical workers to ensure all the targeted girls are vaccinated saying the Health Ministry will continue monitoring to check on the prevalence of the disease.

//Cue in: "The vaccine has ...................Cue out: ........................on the health facilities."//
 
Agnes Biira, a mother from Ihandiro sub-county who had accompanied her daughter for the vaccination commended government for moving a step to save the lives of women from such dangerous diseases. 

Biira says women in the rural areas are vulnerable because of the limited access to cervical cancer screening services.