Moonlighting Persists in Kabarole Despite Ban

1501 Views Fort Portal, Uganda

In short
Joseph Rujumba, the Kabarole district inspector of schools says that teachers who moonlight could be scrapped off the payroll. He however adds that it may not be easy to reprimand the teachers, since they are looking for extra income because of inadequate pay.

Teachers continue roaming from one school to another despite a ban on moonlighting by the Kabarole district education department.  The practice was blamed for a drop in education standards in government schools because teachers were absconding from duty and teaching in private schools.

However, a survey by Uganda Radio Network has established that the practice persists in government aided schools, raising concern among parents and education authorities.

In some of the schools visited by Uganda Radio Network, head teachers admitted that the practice was breeding poor grades, due to continued teacher absenteeism.

Amos Akugizibwe, the deputy head teacher of Kichwamba Primary School says that 11 out of the 25 teachers at the school teach in more than five private schools in the area.
 
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Moses Muhinda, a parent says that teachers who work in more than two schools lack concentration, which affects the pupil performance. He argues that teachers are paid to offer full-time service and that part-time service to other schools amounts to cheating government.
 
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Brian Mugisa, another parent blames school inspectors saying that the practice is a result of inadequate inspection of schools.

Joseph Rujumba, the Kabarole district inspector of schools says that teachers who moonlight could be scrapped off the payroll. He however adds that it may not be easy to reprimand the teachers, since they are looking for extra income because of inadequate pay.

Indeed, Viola Mwesige, a teacher at Nyamiisa Primary School in Bukuku Sub County says that she has spent 13 years in the teaching profession and earns a meager monthly salary of 330,000 Shillings. Mwesige says that she is forced to look for extra income to meet the basic needs of her family.
 
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The Ministry of Education and Sports has in the past threatened disciplinary action against moonlighting teachers. They argue that the practice results to wastage of funds in the education sector since money is being paid to teachers who abscond from duty.

 

About the author

Emmanuel Kajubu
Emmanuel Kajubu is proud to have been the first Ugandan journalist to write in depth pieces about the Tooro Kingdom institution. His knowledge of the inner workings of the Tooro Kingdom is what made him privy to the splits in the royal family. These splits almost challenged Tooro Omukama Oyo Nyimba Iguru's reign.

Culture, agriculture and the environment are just two areas of many of interest to Kajubu. As long as he has held a pen, Kajubu has also written about public policy, health and crime.

Kajubu is keen on impacting his society not just as a writer but also a trainer and mentor. Bundibugyo and Ntoroko districts fall under his docket. Kajubu has been a URN staff member since 2008.