Moroto Registers Slight Improvement In Pit Latrine Coverage

2289 Views Moroto, Uganda

In short
In 2014/2015 financial year, Moroto had only two percent of the households with pit latrines. The district only added 1.2 percent in 2015/2016 financial year. However, in the 2016/2017 financial year, Moroto has been able to reach 15.6 percent in pit latrine coverage.

Moroto district local government has registered a slight improvement in pit latrine coverage. 

In 2014/2015 financial year, Moroto had only two percent of the households with pit latrines. The district only added 1.2 percent in 2015/2016 financial year. However, in the 2016/2017 financial year, Moroto has been able to reach 15.6 percent in pit latrine coverage. 

The report authored by the district health office in Moroto shows that 57 percent of the leaders now have pit latrines in their homes and residences unlike in 2014 where barely 30 percent of leaders could posses pits. 

Andrew Rews Ilukol, the acting Moroto District Health Officer, attributes the improvement in pit latrine coverage to partners. He says that a number of partners like the Dry Land Integrated Project, Welthunger hife and UNICEF among others have been helping to sensitise and construct pit latrines in the district. 

Ilukol identified Nadunget as one of the leading sub counties with pits followed by Rupa. He adds that at least three villages of Kaamera, Namijimij and Kaethin have been declared open defecation free out of 198 villages in the district. 

Christine Akot, the vice chairperson of Moroto district local council, urged her colleagues to lead by example. She notes that the district has been lagging behind in hygiene and sanitation due to lack of exemplary leadership. 

"Well, I am happy to note that the district is making some improvement in pit latrine coverage but it's not enough.  We need to work harder and ensure that we get rid of open defecation in Moroto," Akot said in a recent interview. 

Moroto is the least district across Karamoja sub region with pit latrine coverage. The latrine coverage, however, remains low in Karamoja region, standing at 30 percent compared to national average of 77 percent. Apart from Abim which has 61 percent in pit latrine coverage, the other six districts that make up Karamoja measure below 35 percent.

According to UNICEF, diarrhoea, one of the sanitation related diseases accounts for 10 percent deaths, or 33 deaths daily, of children aged below five years in Karamoja.

Although the health department in the district and municipality was tasked to come up with the shame-list for leaders without pits, it has never been published since 2014.