MPs Want Special Fund to Cater for Disasters

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In short
Members of Parliament are pushing for a law establishing a Special Contingencies Fund to cater for emergencies and disasters. This comes a week after landslides buried at least two villages in Bududa district on June 25, and as Nodding disease continues to ravage homes in Northern Uganda.

Members of Parliament are pushing for a law establishing a Special Contingencies Fund to cater for emergencies and disasters.

The legislators from the greater North said the law would compel government to make special budget allocations for disasters to avoid rushing to Parliament for supplementary budgets.
 
This comes a week after landslides buried at least two villages in Bududa district on June 25, and as Nodding disease continues to ravage homes in Northern Uganda.

Bulambuli County MP Wamakuyu Mudimi says the legislators are writing to the Ministries for Disaster Preparedness and Finance to compel them to bring to Parliament a bill on contingencies fund. The bill would ensure that there is a percentage in the budget to cater for emergencies or disasters before they can occur.

Article 157 of the Constitution stipulates that Parliament shall make provision for the establishment of a Contingencies Fund and shall make laws to regulate the operations of that fund. Mudimi notes that it is high time government operationalised the fund to avoid budget extortions.

The lawmakers, who visited Bududa district to assess the damage of the landslides, recommend that government relocate the landslide victims before another tragedy can occur. Already Uganda Red Cross Society is seeking 4.5 billion shillings as emergency aid for the landslide victims but government says it has no money to relocate the people of Bududa immediately.

Hassan Fungaroo, MP Obongi County observes that it is a big embarrassment that government does not have money to immediately relocate the Mountain Elgon landslide victims.

The Nodding disease syndrome has claimed more than 200 children and another 3,000 are still suffering. Over 2 billion shillings has been allocated to manage the syndrome as doctors look on permanent solutions.