Museveni Wants Law Regulating Monetary Rewards

1804 Views Kampala, Uganda

In short
The request was made through members of the Parliamentary Committee on Commissions, Statutory Authorities and State Enterprise COSASE, now investigating the controversial payment of six billion Shillings to public servants involved in a tax dispute between Uganda and Heritage Oil.

President Museveni has called for the enactment of a law governing rewards and donations to Public servants.

The request was made through members of the Parliamentary Committee on Commissions, Statutory Authorities and State Enterprise (COSASE), now investigating the controversial payment of six billion Shillings to public servants involved in a tax dispute between Uganda and Heritage Oil.

The money was paid out as a token of appreciation to the officials for a role that aided the country to secure USD 400 million (1.4 trillion Shillings) in capital gains tax from Heritage's sale of its stake to Tullow Oil in 2015. The payment, now referred to the presidential handshake attracted sharp criticism from the public, MPs and civil society among other sections of the public.

COSASE chairperson Abdul Katuntu told Journalists at Parliament today that while President Museveni acknowledged that the payout was irregular, he has directed the Attorney General to work with the committee to come up with a law on rewards to public servants.

He says although the president runs a donations budget appropriated by parliament, there are no laws regulating monetary rewards and that the oil bonus payment was not given in context of the law.
 
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The president also directed that a sum of 6 billion Shillings be debited from his donation account and paid back to Uganda Revenue Authority. When asked if the move to refund money by the president was an achievement, Katuntu stated that they are yet to decide on the matter as a committee.

Katuntu says that the committee was satisfied with the answers given by the president, adding that the committee is now headed somewhere with its report.  The committee has interviewed over 60 witnesses as part of the probe.

 

About the author

Alex Otto
“Journalism that changes lives is my goal,” Alex Otto has said on more than one occasion. That is his career’s guiding principle. Has been since he was a radio journalist in the northern Ugandan town of Gulu in 2009.

Otto passionately believes his journalism should bring to the fore the voices of the voiceless like the shooting victims of Apaa. Otto tries in his journalism to ask tough questions to those in positions of authority.

Based in the Kampala bureau, Otto is especially interested in covering agriculture, politics, education, human rights, crime, environment and business. He has reported intensively on the post-conflict situation in northern Uganda.

A URN staff member since 2014, Otto previously worked with The Observer Newspaper from 2012 to 2013 and later the Institute for War and Peace Reporting IWPR based in Gulu.

He was the URN Gulu bureau chief 2014-2016.