NDA, Police Impound Counterfeit Drugs Worth Millions in Arua

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In short
Alfred Akali, the Regional Inspector Arua office, says most of the impounded medicine is from Mac Pharmaceuticals in Kenya, which is not licensed to supply drugs to the country.

National Drug Authority-NDA with the help of Police, have impounded counterfeit medicine in West Nile Region worth over Shillings 20 million following a week long operation. 

During the operation, drug Inspectors visited 90 drug outlets resulting into the closure of 45 drug shops and impounding of medicines from 40 outlets for non-compliance with operating standards.

 
The impounded medicine include tinned paracetamol tablets that were phased out from circulation, chloroquine tablets, Oral Nystatin, folic acid, azithromycin, albendazole, penicillin and anti-malarial drugs among others. Most of impounded drugs originate from Kenya. 


Alfred Akali, the Regional Inspector Arua office, says most of the impounded medicine is from Mac Pharmaceuticals in Kenya, which is not licensed to supply drugs to the country.
 
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During the operation, the Inspectors also recovered two pickup of counterfeit and government branded medicines from the home of Farouq Wakata, the proprietor of  Medicare Clinic in Arua town. 


The medicine was locked up in a room at Wakata's home in Anyafio East village that is also used for accommodation.
 
Josephine Angucia, the West Nile Region Police spokesperson, says they have deployed at the suspect's home to pick him up when he shows up.
 
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The impounded drugs are being kept at Arua Central Police Station as exhibits. There are 450 licensed drug outlets in West Nile region up from 300 in 2012.
 

 

About the author

Annet Lekuru
Annet Lekuru is the Uganda Radio Network bureau chief for Arua. She is new in this post, assigned August 2016. However, she is no stranger to URN subcribers and readers.

Lekuru started her journalism career in 2011 with training from Radio Paris where she worked until April 2015. She started writing for URN in May 2015 as a freelance reporter.

Lekuru loves and continues to admire URN because of the reporter privilege to identify and report on issues close to one's heart which offers an opportunity to the reporter to develop a passion in a beat and report on it exhaustively.

With a background training in Conflict Sensitive Journalism she hopes to graduate into doing remarkable and recognised human rights and human interest stories in the near future.

She is interested in reporting on issues of justice, law, human rights and health.