'Every Last Child' Campaign Brings Hope to Vulnerable Children

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In short
Through the 3-year campaign, government is urged to consider the needs of vulnerable children in budgeting processes, in resource allocation. This will give them equal opportunity to survive and benefit from access to healthcare and education regardless of where they live.

Kaboyo Yasinta dropped out of school after conceiving at the age of 16. She was disowned by her father and forced to marry the man who was responsible for the pregnancy.

The man however, was not ready for the responsibility. They got involved because he offered her routine transport to her school which was distant from her home in Bundibugyo district. Yasinta was not in love and so was the man.  She was eventually thrown out of the would-be husband's house, shattering her hope for a happy life.

While at cross roads, Yasinta was picked up by Save the Children, an international non-governmental organization that promotes children's rights. She was trained in financial management and given financial assistance to start a new life.  Today she is economically empowered and able to provide for her family.

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Children like her are the target of a new global campaign dubbed ‘Every Last Child,' unveiled all over the world by Save the Children.  The campaign will be used to improve the lives of millions of the most excluded and vulnerable children across the country.

Through the 3-year campaign, government is urged to consider the needs of vulnerable children in budgeting processes, in resource allocation. This will give them equal opportunity to survive and benefit from access to healthcare and education regardless of where they live.

Save the Children's Country Director Barbara Burroughs says the campaign calls for ensuring fair finance, equal treatment and accountability to disadvantaged children in all parts of the county. She is optimistic that the effort will bridge the gap between the children in urban and remote areas.
 
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Child Health Commissioner Dr Jessica Nsungwa describes the campaign as vital in addressing the urgent needs of the children in hard to reach areas. She said that the ministry will work with the local council leaders to identify every child who is born, monitor how they access medical services and also their stay in school.

She also observes a need to review the funding policy for districts to focus on the unique needs of each district as opposed to population size.
 
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Ann Kansiime, the campaign ambassador says that there is a lot that the government needs to do to save the children from a grim future.
 
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Florence Mutyabule, the chairperson of Uganda Parliamentary Forum for Children said that the campaign brings more need for commitment by the members of parliament to sensitize their electorate about the need for communal responsibility on the plight of children.
 
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About the author

Beatrice Nyangoma
Beatrice Nyangoma values her independence as a journalist. This was one of her major considerations before she became a URN staffer in 2015.

Nyangoma says, "I like URN because it gives me room to decide what stories I want to work on. That is so important to me."

The URN Jinja bureau chief since July 2016, Nyangoma considers health matters a beat close to her heart. One of the highlights of her career so far were her exclusive interviews unveiling the rot in Mulago hospital in early 2016.

Nyangoma started out writing for the Red Pepper newspaper in 2011 in her final year of university. She was majorly a health reporter. In 2012, Nyangoma moved to Top Television as a health, business reporter and weekend news editor. She was also the assistant editorial manager of Kabarole Research and Resource Centre FM (KRC FM).