Kabaka Mutebi Praises Nkangi's Selfless Service

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In short
Kabaka Mutebi on Jehoash Mayanja Nkangi: We have walked with him during times of joy, sadness and challenges. We appreciate his role when the Kingdom experienced turbulent times in 1966. We thank God for his life and for enabling him fulfil all his responsibilities.

Kabaka of Buganda Ronald Muwenda Mutebi has praised former Katikkiro Jehoash Mayanja Nkangi for standing with the family when Sir Edward Mutesa II was in exile.

In his message read out by Kabaka's sister Nnalinya Sarah Kagere to the hundreds of mourners at Namirembe Cathedral, Kabaka Mutebi expressed sadness over the death of Nkangi noting how the deceased began struggling and serving the kingdom 59 years ago.

Nnalinya Kagere represented the family of Mutesa during a requiem mass for the late Mayanja Nkangi. She also carried a written condolence message from Kabaka Ronald Muwenda Mutebi II.

The Kabaka described Nkangi as a person who has exhibited hard work, humbleness, patience and respect for all people in his service over the years. 

"We have walked with him during times of joy, sadness and challenges. We appreciate his role when the Kingdom experienced turbulent times in 1966. We thank God for his life and for enabling him fulfil all his responsibilities," reads part of the condolence message. 

Kabaka Mutebi appealed to his subjects to pick an example from the late Nkangi's transparency and service.

On her part, Nnalinya Kagere described the Nkangi as a wise man, hard worker and transparent.
 
Nkangi served in many high-profile offices in his long public life, including as Katikkiro of Buganda from 1964 to 1966 when the Obote I government attacked Mengo palace and exiled Mutesa. Nkangi also fled to exile in England and continued to perform his duties albeit in abeyance, even after Mutesa's death.
 
When Mutesa died in November 1969, Nkangi together with the then Crown Prince, now Kabaka Ronald Muwenda Mutebi II, performed the succession rituals which are expected of a crown prince within the norms of Buganda Kingdom.
 
Nkangi later returned in 1971 upon the fall of the Obote regime and participated in the return of Mutesa's remains in March of that year. He again finalised the rituals that were supposed to be performed by the Crown Prince Mutebi.
 
Nnalinya Kagere recounts the death of her father Mutesa describing it as a bad dream and at the time she got close to the late Nkangi as a 'young girl' while in exile, in London. 
 
//Cue in: "Mukisera ekyo…
Cue out:…ekyo."//
 
Nnalinya Kagere, who described Nkangi as a great statesman of Uganda, said that while in exile the deceased at all times kept the hope alive within Mutesa's family saying that he kept telling them that a day would come and they would return to their home land.
 
//Cue in: "Ngera…
Cue out:…ddala."//
 
Nkangi kept in his custody Buganda's ceremonial mace --the Ddamula -- a symbol of authority of the office of Katikkiro from 1966 until 1993 when kingdoms were restored.
 
The deceased participated in the enthronement of Kabaka Ronald Muwenda Mutebi II at Naggalabi - Buddo in July 1993.
 

 

About the author

Olive Nakatudde
Olive Nakatudde is a URN journalist based in Kampala. Nakatudde has been a URN staff member since 2013.

Nakatudde started out in journalism in 2009 with Dembe FM radio in Kampala. In 2012, Nakatudde joined Voice of Africa as a political reporter. She has been a photographer since her journalism school days at Makerere University.

Nakatudde is interested in good governance and public policy, which she reports on intensively from the Uganda Parliament. She is a keen follower of cultural affairs in Buganda Kingdom and covers the kingdom's Lukiiko (parliament). Nakatudde also reports on education and health.