Number of South Sudanese Entering Uganda Drops

1632 Views Kampala, Uganda

In short
Charlie Yaxley, the Associate External Relations Officer of the United Nations High Commission for Refugees, says the number of those fleeing violence from Juba has reduced compared to a month ago.

Although peace is returning to the South Sudan Capital Juba, between 200 and 300 South Sudanese nationals cross into Uganda on a daily basis. This is a great reduction from the more than 1000 South Sudanese who were crossing into Uganda each day at the peak of the clashes between forces loyal to President, Salva Kiir and his former first vice president, Riek Machar in July.
 

At least 300 people were killed and more than 1.6 million other displaced. Titus Jogo, the Refugee Desk Officer, Office of the Prime Minister, says although peace is returning in Juba, many of the reporting refugees still feel they will be safe when they flee. He says Government is doing its best to rehabilitate and integrate the refugees, some of whom came with injuries.



Charlie Yaxley, the Associate External Relations Officer of the United Nations High Commission for Refugees, says the number of those fleeing violence from Juba has reduced compared to a month ago. Uganda is currently home to 314,000 South Sudanese refugees.




Yaxley says the continuous influx of South Sudanese refugees into Uganda raises a major financial challenge as Government, and the UN body is operating under a very tight budget. 

Uganda and UNHCR are operating with a short fall of 21 million dollars under their budget to cater for the needs of the refugees such as providing food, shelter and medication among other things. He appealed to donors and well-wishers to provide shelter and medicine for refugees in various camps.

 

About the author

Alex Otto
“Journalism that changes lives is my goal,” Alex Otto has said on more than one occasion. That is his career’s guiding principle. Has been since he was a radio journalist in the northern Ugandan town of Gulu in 2009.

Otto passionately believes his journalism should bring to the fore the voices of the voiceless like the shooting victims of Apaa. Otto tries in his journalism to ask tough questions to those in positions of authority.

Based in the Kampala bureau, Otto is especially interested in covering agriculture, politics, education, human rights, crime, environment and business. He has reported intensively on the post-conflict situation in northern Uganda.

A URN staff member since 2014, Otto previously worked with The Observer Newspaper from 2012 to 2013 and later the Institute for War and Peace Reporting IWPR based in Gulu.

He was the URN Gulu bureau chief 2014-2016.