Museveni Yet to Sign Cancer Institute Bill Passed in May

3900 Views Kampala, Uganda

In short
On May 5, 2016, the 9th Parliament passed the Bill, whose objective is to give the Uganda Cancer Institute semi-autonomous status and receive a separate vote. It also gives the institute mandate to coordinate prevention and treatment of cancer and conduct research on cancer in the country. Article 91 3 of the constitution requires the President, on being sent a bill passed by Parliament, to assent to it within 30 days or write back to the Speaker, rejecting it.

The delay by President Yoweri Museveni to assent to the Uganda Cancer Institute Bill 2015 has raised questions in Parliament.

The Speaker of Parliament, Rebecca Kadaga has demanded for an explanation from the President, on why the bill has not been assented to, more than four months after it was passed in Parliament.
 
On May 5, 2016, the 9th Parliament passed the Bill, whose objective is to give the Uganda Cancer Institute semi-autonomous status and receive a separate vote. It also gives the institute mandate to coordinate prevention and treatment of cancer and conduct research on cancer in the country.
 
It will also facilitate the setting up of cancer treatment centres in all regions, and source for funding to finance treatment of cancer patients.
 
Kadaga, while welcoming members today back from a one-month recess, noted that she has not been informed formally by the President on the status of the bill.
 
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Article 91 (3) of the constitution requires the President, on being sent a bill passed by Parliament, to assent to it within 30 days or write back to the Speaker, rejecting it.
 
Kadaga says with the Uganda Cancer Institute currently barely able to handle a rise in cases of cancer patients, it is imperative that the bill becomes operational to facilitate sourcing of finances for treatment of patients.
 
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Several Ugandans have been grappling with costs of cancer treatment, with those who can afford seeking treatment abroad.
 
Government maintains that the institute's semi-autonomous status will help to source for state-of-the-art equipment to facilitate treatment at lower costs.

For a year now, the institute has been in the news after its radiology machine broke down and Mulago Hospital, under which the institute operates currently,  said there was no money to purchase a new machine.

 

About the author

Olive Eyotaru
Olive Eyotaru is a URN journalist based in Kampala. Eyotaru has been a URN staff member since February 2015.

Eyotaru started practising journalism while still studying at Uganda Christian University. She was a reporter with Ultimate Media Consult Ltd between 2005 and 2007.

In 2009, Eyotaru joined Monitor Publications Limited, under KFM Radio as a parliamentary and business reporter. Consequently, Eyotaru started writing for the Daily Monitor newspaper until January 2015, when she moved to URN.

She is interested in reporting about politics, health, human rights, business and sports.