Pay Negotiations With Teachers to Continue, Says Education ministry

2542 Views Kampala, Uganda

In short
The Ministry of Education insists President Yoweri Museveni’s remarks that increasing teachers salaries will be subversive to national development should be appreciated.

The Ministry of Education insists President Yoweri Museveni’s remarks that increasing teachers salaries will be subversive to national development should be appreciated.
 
Spokesperson Aggrey Kibenge says the ministry will continue negotiating with teachers about their grievances but they should also appreciate the challenges the government is currently facing.
 
He adds that the matter is now out of ministry’s control and President Museveni speaking about it makes their work easy since he has the final say.
 
Teachers under their umbrella organization, Uganda National Teachers Union petitioned the social services committee of Parliament and demanded a 100% pay- rise.
 
UNATU chairperson Margaret Rwabushaija tells URN that they were surprised to get the President’s comment through the media. Rwabushaija says since they have been communicating with government through their organization, President Museveni should have used the same channel to get back to them. She insists a meaningful meeting should be set between them and the President.
 
Rwabashaija says their meeting with all education chairpersons around the country will take place as scheduled on Wednesday at Bat Valley in Kampala to forge a way forward.

However, Kibenge says teachers holding a strike will not change the situation or solve their problems.

There are about 152,682 teachers on the Government payroll in primary and secondary schools. Museveni said teachers are too many that even an increment of 100,000 shillings can heavily impact on the economy at a time when the shilling is limping against the dollar.
 
On average a primary school teacher gets 200,000 shillings per month, while secondary school teachers earn about 450,000 shillings.

Teachers argue that their current salary is too low, which forces some of them to seek for greener pastures elsewhere and do other businesses to cover the gap.
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