Private Schools Must Be Taxed, says URA's Akol

1977 Views Kampala, Uganda

In short
Akol said it makes no sense taxing other far smaller businesses like saloons, garages and stationery shops and exempt private schools which make much more money.

Private schools, like all businesses in Uganda have to pay their fair share of taxes,  Doris Akol, the Commissioner-General of Uganda Revenue Authority (URA) has said.

Addressing small business owners in Kampala on Monday morning in a post-budget analysis meeting, Akol said private schools are actually businesses which make incomes that are taxable.
 
Akol said it makes no sense taxing other far smaller businesses like saloons, garages and stationery shops and exempt private schools which make much more money.
 
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Akol explained that the government offered a 10-year income tax exemption for private schools in order to attract many players, build their capacity and establish Uganda as a regional education hub.
 
The Commissioner-General said that move indeed succeeded and it explains why Uganda has a lot of foreign students particularly at secondary and tertiary levels, adding that in some universities, there are more foreign students than Ugandan ones
 
URA will tax the profits the private schools make and not the school fees she says. This, she explained, should not trigger the private school owners hiking schools fees because it would tantamount to dishonesty.
 
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Akol's clarification followed a string of complaints over the proposed income tax from private school owners who attended the meeting.

 

About the author

David Rupiny
In his own words, David Rupiny says, "I am literally a self-trained journalist with over 12 years of experience. Add the formative, student days then I can trace my journalism roots to 1988 when as a fresher in Ordinary Level I used to report for The Giraffe News at St Aloysius College Nyapea in northern Uganda.


In addition to URN for which I have worked for five years now, I have had stints at Radio Paidha, Radio Pacis, Nile FM and KFM. I have also contributed stories for The Crusader, The New Vision and The Monitor. I have also been a contributor for international news organisations like the BBC and Institute for War and Peace Reporting. I am also a local stringer for Radio Netherlands Worldwide.


I am also a media entrepreneur. I founded The West Niler newspaper and now runs Rainbow Media Corporation (Rainbow Radio 88.2 FM in Nebbi). My areas of interest are conflict and peacebuilding, business, climate change, health and children and young people, among others."