Rwenzori Region Land Office Idle Two Years after Completion

3963 Views Fort Portal, Uganda

In short
The regional office is mandated to coordinate land transactions, provide technical support, guidance and support supervision to the district land boards in the region. Services at the office include registering caveats, mortgages, transfer and letters of administration. Other services will be replacement of damaged titles and title search.

The Rwenzori region land office remains idle, two years after its completion.

The offices, at Kitumba, Fort Portal, were constructed in 2011 by the government with support from the World Bank. They are meant to serve districts of Kabarole, Kyegegwa, Ntoroko, Bundibugyo, Kamwenge, Kyejonjo and Kasese.  Construction of the eleven-room facility cost Ugx 1.5 billion.

The regional office is mandated to coordinate land transactions, provide technical support, guidance and support supervision to the district land boards in the region. Services at the office include registering caveats, mortgages, transfer and letters of administration. Other services will be replacement of damaged titles and title search.

The Rwenzori region land office is among the 12 offices that the government constructed and refurbished. The offices are in Kampala, Mukono, Wakiso, Masaka, Mbarara and Jinja. Other regional offices are in the districts of Mbale, Kibaale, Masindi, Arua, Gulu and Lira.

Although, it was expected to begin operations in 2012, the office remains closed with no activity taking place.   The place has now been turned into a habitat for rodents.

Peter Alinda, the Kabarole district lands officer says he has no knowledge why the offices aren’t functional but is optimistic that it will soon open.

In a telephone interview, Richard Oputi, the project coordinator in the Ministry of Lands says that the offices remain closed due to a delay in releasing funds to purchase computers and furniture for the offices. He says that since the offices will be computerized, it’s useless to open the offices without facilities.

Richard Bagonza, a resident of Fort Portal says that the government should speed up the opening of the offices since it will bring services closer to the people. Bagonza says that he has spent more than Ugx 200,000 to process a land title in Kampala and Entebbe.
 
//Cue in: "they are timely."//
Cue out: "...costs are high."//
 
Last year, government completed the project of computerizing Uganda’s land registry which will greatly minimize land conflicts in the country, forgeries of land titles and the red tape in searching for land information.  The project of computerizing the land registry was a grant from the World Bank at a cost of US$23.5m.

 

About the author

Emmanuel Kajubu
Emmanuel Kajubu is proud to have been the first Ugandan journalist to write in depth pieces about the Tooro Kingdom institution. His knowledge of the inner workings of the Tooro Kingdom is what made him privy to the splits in the royal family. These splits almost challenged Tooro Omukama Oyo Nyimba Iguru's reign.

Culture, agriculture and the environment are just two areas of many of interest to Kajubu. As long as he has held a pen, Kajubu has also written about public policy, health and crime.

Kajubu is keen on impacting his society not just as a writer but also a trainer and mentor. Bundibugyo and Ntoroko districts fall under his docket. Kajubu has been a URN staff member since 2008.