Second Season Harvest Improves National Food Security

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Food supply is expected to be higher than the same time last year. Although staple food prices are expected to remain slightly above average, they will remain within levels that allow for near-normal food access.

The latest food situation the country is expected to restore household and market food stocks.
 
The USAID-funded Uganda Food Security Outlook report for October 2017-May 2018 says above-average volumes of staple foods is expected from November to January, which will restore household and market food stocks to typical levels.
 
It says food supply is expected to be higher than the same time last year.
It however says staple food prices are expected to remain slightly above average, and that they will remain within levels that allow for near-normal food access.
 
 
In addition to average harvests, poor households are expected to earn typical levels of income through normal livelihood activities including the sale of crops and poultry, pretty trade, and casual labor, which will allow households to purchase basic food and non-food needs.
 
Minimal acute food insecurity is expected in most areas through May, including Kotido and Abim of Karamoja.
 
In all other areas of Karamoja, though, poor households are expected to be stressed throughout the majority of the projection period.
 
The report says South Sudanese refugees are expected to continue facing food stress through December.
 
The report warns that the refuge food stress could worsen in the absence of additional funding to guarantee continued assistance.

The report says food security is improving among poor households in Karamoja with the harvest.

Sorghum harvests are estimated to be near average in most areas, but maize crop prospects are less favorable due to Fall Armyworm (FAW) infestations.

Karamoja, farmers have been harvesting sorghum since September. The harvest is complete in southern Nakapiripirit, but ongoing in central and northern areas where crops matured later than normal due to the delayed onset of rainfall.

 Late season rainfall improved sorghum crops that had suffered early season moisture stress and it is estimated sorghum production is average in most areas.

The report says average to above average rainfall in bimodal areas is expected to result in average November/December harvests.

It warns that some maize crop losses are expected due to the fall Armyworm (FAW) infestations, though recent field reports indicate impacts are less significant than originally expected.

Increased pest management and prevention in some areas has resulted to the low rate of damage compared to the previous seasons says the report.