Security Deployment to be Maintained Until Swearing In

1523 Views Kampala, Uganda

In short
Fred Enanga, Police spokesperson, says the officers will stay until all elected leaders are sworn-in in May because some of the election leaders may want to disrupt the swearing in.

The security deployment around the city will remain to avert any possible violence until all elected leaders are sworn in. The deployed security personnel include Police, Military police and intelligence officers.
 
The officers were deployed strategically at key installations such as power and pump fuel stations and roundabouts in Kampala ahead of the February 18th presidential election.
 
Some of the officers were involved in both motorized and foot patrols in the city suburbs. Fred Enanga, Police spokesperson, says the officers will stay until all elected leaders are sworn-in in May because some of the election leaders may want to disrupt the swearing in.

 
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According to Enanga, the 2016 elections security master plan provided for heavy military police and police deployment in Kampala before, during and the post-election period.
 
He however, says they have relaxed on some of the roadblocks that were erected on the roads leading to and out of Kampala although the barriers still exist, adding that they can only activate them if necessary to carry spot checks.
 
Security had set up road blocks on Gayaza road, Jinja road, Kampala Gulu-roads, Hoima road and Entebbe road among others. 

Ibrahim Semujju Nganda, the opposition Forum for Democratic Change-FDC party spokesperson, told URN that he no longer believes what police says, adding that he is not sure other Ugandans do.
 
He says the continued security deployment in the city only works to intimidate Ugandans. 
 
 
 

 

About the author

Alex Otto
“Journalism that changes lives is my goal,” Alex Otto has said on more than one occasion. That is his career’s guiding principle. Has been since he was a radio journalist in the northern Ugandan town of Gulu in 2009.

Otto passionately believes his journalism should bring to the fore the voices of the voiceless like the shooting victims of Apaa. Otto tries in his journalism to ask tough questions to those in positions of authority.

Based in the Kampala bureau, Otto is especially interested in covering agriculture, politics, education, human rights, crime, environment and business. He has reported intensively on the post-conflict situation in northern Uganda.

A URN staff member since 2014, Otto previously worked with The Observer Newspaper from 2012 to 2013 and later the Institute for War and Peace Reporting IWPR based in Gulu.

He was the URN Gulu bureau chief 2014-2016.