South Sudan Conflict Crippling Education In Northern Uganda

1690 Views Gulu, Uganda

In short
Abel Kyanira Apuuli, the Principal of the Institute, says they suspended the intake of South Sudan students for the new academic semester, which starts in May because of the heavy depreciation of the South Sudan currency.

The fighting in South Sudan has taken a huge toll on the activities at the East African Institute For Management Science in Amuru district. The East African Institute For Management Science is located at Garden City in Elegu in Atiak Sub County.
 
 
The school authorities say they were forced to suspend a number of activities due to the conflict. Abel Kyanira Apuuli, the Principal of the Institute, says they suspended the intake of South Sudan students for the new academic semester, which starts in May because of the heavy depreciation of the South Sudan currency.
 

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To cope with low number of students, Apuuli says registration for August intake has been prolonged from February to May.
 
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The number of international students at the campus has drastically reduced from about 150 to the current 100 over the past two years. Towards the end of March this year, Job Makwel, a diploma student at the campus was shot dead as he crossed from Elegu to South Sudan to notify his parents to organise for his graduation.

  


Ronald Oyo, a staff at the Institute, says despite the challenges, the campus will remain open to South Sudan students. The institute teaches business management and social sciences courses including Journalism, information and Communication technology at Certificate and Diploma levels.
 
 
 
East African Institute For Management Science is not the only one affected. Many South Sudan students studying in Gulu told URN they are struggling to pay tuition due to the depreciation of South Sudan pounds.


Kenneth Kuol, a student at Trinity College in Gulu says many of his colleagues have dropped out of school, adding that his parents now pay his tuition through installment. Fresh fighting broke out in South Sudan in July 2015 between troops loyal to Dr. Riek Machar, the former first vice President and those loyal to President Salva Kiir. 

 
Hundreds of people have been killed and tens of thousands been displaced by the conflict that is not about to end. Millions of the displaced are living in large refugee camps in neighboring countries including Uganda. 


The head of operations at the Sudan People's Liberation Army (SPLA) 5th division headquarters in Western Bhar el Ghazal region, Brig. Gen. Peter Par and his counterpart for logistics were reportedly killed while returning from an operation in latest fighting on Monday. 


Four thousand refugees were forced into Lamwo district in Northern Uganda as dozens including a Ugandan trader were reported dead.
 

 

About the author

Peter Labeja
Peter Labeja has been a practicing journalist for the last 13 years during which he has covered part of the brutal conflict which bedeviled Northern Uganda as well as the painful transition to Peace thereafter. Emerging post conflict issues such as land rights of under privileged widows and orphans, challenges of access to social services in the immediate aftermath of Lord’s Resistance Army conflict in Northern Uganda.

Labeja is now the Northern Uganda Bureau chief in Acholi Sub Region since 2014 - Gulu, Amuru, Nwoya and Omoro districts as well as South Sudan falls within his areas of jurisdiction. He previously worked with The Vision Group for four years.

Labeja’s major career interests are in Climate Change; Agriculture and Environment - natural resources such as Water, Oil and Gas; Transitional Justice; Human Rights, Democracy and Governance as well as South Sudan’s humanitarian crisis. In 2013, Labeja was awarded a prestigious Pan African Journalism Award for excellence in journalism at United Nation’s UNEP headquarters in Nairobi, Kenya for Climate Change and Health Reporting.