South Sudan Refugees In Uganda Cry For Peace

2160 Views Gulu, Uganda

In short
Pop Peter, the secretary of Nuer Chiefdom in South Sudan says a non-violent style of politics is what leaders in the war-ravaged nation should adopt for displaced refugees to return home.

South Sudan refugees in Uganda want factions fighting in their country to give peace a chance by returning to the negotiation table.
 
The refugees were speaking on the sidelines of a peace week being celebrated in Gulu district under the theme: Non Violence, a style of politics.
 
Pop Peter, the secretary of Nuer Chiefdom in South Sudan says a non-violent style of politics is what leaders in the war-ravaged nation should adopt for displaced refugees to return home.
 
"Life as refugees is very hard. We left our sources of livelihood, cattle and farms behind to live as beggars. This is very unfortunate. We are all eager to go back to continue with our normal lives," he stated.
 
Taban Paredo Locusmoi, a refugee student studying in St. Lawrence University in Uganda says he was saddened to visit fellow countrymen living in settlement camps in Uganda.
 
"I witnessed stories of great hunger, human suffering and malnutrition among young children. I want those fighting in South Sudan to stop the conflict through negotiation," Tabal pleaded.
 
The conflict in South Sudan broke out in July 2015 between forces loyal to former vice president Riek Machar and President Salva Kiir. It effectively ended a power-sharing government between President Kiir and Dr Machar that was sealed through a peace accord mediated by the Inter-governmental Authority on Development (IGAD).

IGAD leaders had stepped in to end yet another cycle of fighting following an outbreak of civil war in December 2013.

The peace week organised by the Catholic Archdiocese of Gulu brought together Christians from West Nile, Lango and Acholi sub regions.
 
Reverend Father Geno Mwaka, the vice chancellor of Sacred Heart University in Gulu told the congregation that "the world is hungry for non - violent style of politics". He said such politics could prevent the untold human suffering in Syria, Iraq and South Sudan among others.
 
The chairperson of Uganda Episcopal Conference, Archbishop John Baptist Odama, is officiating over the peace week. He said national prosperity and human development can never be achieved without sustainable peace.