South Sudan's Conflict Displaced 3,500 Every day in October

1322 Views Kampala, Uganda

In short
The biggest part of this outflow has been into Uganda, which has seen around 2,400 new arrivals every day since the beginning of October and over a quarter of a million new refugees since the re-eruption of violence in Juba on 7 July. Nine out of every ten are women and children.

South Sudan's conflict, which has spawned one of the world's biggest humanitarian crises, displaced an average 3,500 people each day during the month of October, Data by the United Nations High Commission for Refugees-UNHCR shows.

The biggest part of this outflow has been into Uganda, which has seen around 2,400 new arrivals every day since the beginning of October and over a quarter of a million new refugees since the re-eruption of violence in Juba on 7 July. Nine out of every ten are women and children.

UNHCR reports that most refugees are fleeing the Equatoria regions of South Sudan, which borders Uganda. They report armed groups harassing civilians, killings and torture of people suspected of supporting opposing factions, burning of villages, sexual assaults of women and girls and forced recruitment of young men and boys.

Charlie Yaxley the UNHCR spokesperson in Kampala says that in recent weeks, refugees have been increasingly using informal border crossing points, reportedly due to the presence of armed groups along main roads. Many refugees report having had to walk through the bush for days, often without food or water.

A new settlement, Bidibidi, which was opened in August, has become one of the largest refugee-hosting areas in the world. It is now home to 170,000 South Sudanese refugees.  But Yaxley says UNHCR is struggling to providing immediate, life-saving assistance, including food, water and shelter to the refugees as a result of severe under funding.

Water supply is also a major challenge in Bidibidi, where needs are fast growing. Steps are underway to identify urgently-needed water sources in the camp as currently water is being trucked, at great expense, from a treatment plant around 50 kilometers away.