Truck Drivers Call Off Uganda - South Sudan Border Strike Top story

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In short
South Sudan deputy interior Minister Riaw Gatlier Gai told the drivers that the challenges that sparked their strikes had been resolved with establishment of new security installations along the trade route.

Lorry drivers from the East African Community region who have been on strike at the Uganda - South Sudan border in Amuru district have finally called off their week-long strike.
 
The drivers agreed to resume entry into South Sudan after holding lengthy talks with a delegation of South Sudan government on Friday.
 
The members of the delegation included senior military and Police officers led by the Minister of Interior, South Sudan Police Services, Lt. General Majok Akec Malok and his deputy Riaw Gatlier Gai among.
 
Their Ugandan counterpart were led by Bosco Otim, the regional Police Commander North and other UPDF officials. They first met in the South Sudan town of Nimule before addressing the striking drivers in Uganda border township of Elegu.
 
Some of the issues that caused the strikes including financial extortions by South Sudan security officials between Nimule and Juba, harassment and mistreatment, arbitrary arrest and killing, too many check points among others.
 
South Sudan deputy interior Minister Riaw Gatlier Gai told the drivers that the challenges that sparked off their strikes had been resolved with establishment of new security measures along the trade route.
 
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Gai said checks points had been reduced from more than 30 to only three in Nimule, Nisitu and Obama adding that security deployment along the great trade route had been overhauled.
 
He said government had set up a security post at a mountain hot spot where trucks traveling to South Sudan are often attacked and payment of all taxes have been gazetted for Nimule border point only.
 
Abdulatiff Bukenya, a Ugandan semi Trailer driver told URN the challenges they go through while working in South Sudan are too many.
 
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Bukenya said they are uncertain if the new measures will hold for a long time.
 
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Other drivers pleaded with South Sudan government to ensure that the new measures are implemented.
 

 

About the author

Peter Labeja
Peter Labeja has been a practicing journalist for the last 13 years during which he has covered part of the brutal conflict which bedeviled Northern Uganda as well as the painful transition to Peace thereafter. Emerging post conflict issues such as land rights of under privileged widows and orphans, challenges of access to social services in the immediate aftermath of Lord’s Resistance Army conflict in Northern Uganda.

Labeja is now the Northern Uganda Bureau chief in Acholi Sub Region since 2014 - Gulu, Amuru, Nwoya and Omoro districts as well as South Sudan falls within his areas of jurisdiction. He previously worked with The Vision Group for four years.

Labeja’s major career interests are in Climate Change; Agriculture and Environment - natural resources such as Water, Oil and Gas; Transitional Justice; Human Rights, Democracy and Governance as well as South Sudan’s humanitarian crisis. In 2013, Labeja was awarded a prestigious Pan African Journalism Award for excellence in journalism at United Nation’s UNEP headquarters in Nairobi, Kenya for Climate Change and Health Reporting.