Uganda Lauded on Green Economy Ambitions

2001 Views Nairobi, Kenya

In short
The Government last year launched the Uganda Green Growth Development Strategy UGGDS. The strategy is one of the steps that must be taken by government to achieve the envisaged transformation in an inclusive and environmentally sustainable way.

The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) has hailed Uganda's efforts towards development without degrading the environment.
 
The Government last year launched the Uganda Green Growth Development Strategy (UGGDS).
The strategy is one of the steps that must be taken by the government to achieve the envisaged transformation in an inclusive and environmentally sustainable way.
 
The Strategy unpacks the key green growth issues contained in NDP II and Vision 2040 and provides the blueprint for Uganda's transition into a green economy. It highlights areas with the highest potential for green growth's contribution to Gross Domestic Product (GDP), employment, resource use efficiency, social inclusiveness and equity, as well as environmental sustainability. 

It focuses on areas like mass transport systems for urban areas, planned urbanization/green cities providing linkage between industrial production in cities to the raw material production in rural areas and emphasis on greening the energy mix to include solar.

Martin Asiimwe, the coordinator Forest and Biodiversity WWF says that Uganda is currently emphasizing tourism, which is a non-consumptive economy.

He says with tourism, Uganda will continue earning from wildlife which does not degrade the environment.

Asiimwe was one of the experts at the Global Landscape Forum in Nairobi. The Forum which closed on Thursday brought together several experts to find a solution to the forest and land degradation in Africa. 

With an estimated 2.8 million hectares of forests lost each year, deforestation and land degradation remain significant challenges in Africa.

Uganda was singled out among the countries with success stories in efforts to restore degraded forest and land. Others included Madagascar, Rwanda, Senegal, Malawi, Ethiopia and Niger, where local communities have restored more than 5 million hectares of degraded landscapes.
 
 
 Asiimwe told URN that Uganda however still needs to increase on its forestry restoration efforts by ensuring that it adds the same number of trees cut annually. 

Asiimwe says scaling up the uptake of green energy sources like solar, and increasing hydropower are all indicators of a green economy.

He says certification of green products like organic agricultural products, certified forests, and certified legal trade in trees and timber could be lead Uganda to a green economy.

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Tim Christophersen, the head of Freshwater, land and environment with UN Environment told URN in an interview that green economies are a more sustainable form of development. 

He says countries should channel its resources to green economies like tourism, Agriculture and forestry that many can identify with.

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About the author

Alex Otto
“Journalism that changes lives is my goal,” Alex Otto has said on more than one occasion. That is his career’s guiding principle. Has been since he was a radio journalist in the northern Ugandan town of Gulu in 2009.

Otto passionately believes his journalism should bring to the fore the voices of the voiceless like the shooting victims of Apaa. Otto tries in his journalism to ask tough questions to those in positions of authority.

Based in the Kampala bureau, Otto is especially interested in covering agriculture, politics, education, human rights, crime, environment and business. He has reported intensively on the post-conflict situation in northern Uganda.

A URN staff member since 2014, Otto previously worked with The Observer Newspaper from 2012 to 2013 and later the Institute for War and Peace Reporting IWPR based in Gulu.

He was the URN Gulu bureau chief 2014-2016.