Uganda Prisons: 107 Inmates Sit PLE

2255 Views Gulu, Uganda

In short
Richard Ocieng another inmate says his arrest gave him a chance to enroll for primary education. Ocieng says he started in primary three and hopes to study further and become a doctor when he is out of jail.

A total of 107 inmates in various prisons across the country registered for this year’s Primary Leaving Examinations-PLE, the Uganda Prisons Service has disclosed.

Frank Baine, the spokesperson Uganda Prisons Service says 42 inmates are sitting from Upper prison, 12 Jinja prisons, 11 Kigo prisons, 10 Gulu prisons, 10 Murchison bay prisons, 12 Ngora main, 7 in karamoja and 3 in Luzira zone.

He explains that education is one of the keys to rehabilitating offenders since it is very effective in instilling moral in the inmates. Baine says they have registered several success stories of inmates who sat their examinations while serving their jail terms.
 
He explains that despite the fact that Uganda Prisons Service gives advice and guidance on education, the program is entirely voluntary. Titus Omony is one the inmates who wrote their Primary Leaving Examinations at Gulu prisons. Omony who is on remand hopes to enroll in a technical school and continue with his studies once he regains his freedom.
 
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Cue out: …like money//
 
Richard Ocieng another inmate says his arrest gave him a chance to enroll for primary education. Ocieng says he started in primary three and hopes to study further and become a doctor when he is out of jail.
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Cue out…a doctor”//

The inmates told URN that they have a library and construction of classrooms for other inmates who want to enroll is ongoing. The inmates are taught by qualified teachers.

Margaret Orik Obonyo, the officer in charge of Gulu prisons says inmates who enroll for education in the prison are very disciplined. She says the education will go a long way in building the inmates future and lifestyle. The 107 inmates sitting PLE are among the 582,085 pupils who are sitting across the country.
 
 
 
 

 

 

About the author

Alex Otto
“Journalism that changes lives is my goal,” Alex Otto has said on more than one occasion. That is his career’s guiding principle. Has been since he was a radio journalist in the northern Ugandan town of Gulu in 2009.

Otto passionately believes his journalism should bring to the fore the voices of the voiceless like the shooting victims of Apaa. Otto tries in his journalism to ask tough questions to those in positions of authority.

Based in the Kampala bureau, Otto is especially interested in covering agriculture, politics, education, human rights, crime, environment and business. He has reported intensively on the post-conflict situation in northern Uganda.

A URN staff member since 2014, Otto previously worked with The Observer Newspaper from 2012 to 2013 and later the Institute for War and Peace Reporting IWPR based in Gulu.

He was the URN Gulu bureau chief 2014-2016.