Ugandans Want More Money Towards Social Services

1652 Views Kampala, Uganda

In short
Finance Minister Matia Kasaija presents the financial year 2017/18 national budget to Parliament today with Works and Transport taking the highest allocation at 4.8 trillion Shillings. This is followed by Energy and education at 2.4 trillion, Health at 1.8 trillion and Security at 1.4 trillion Shillings among others.

Several Ugandans have said the budget should have more funds channeled towards social services like health and education and social protection.
 
Finance Minister Matia Kasaija presents the financial year 2017/18 national budget to Parliament today with Works and Transport taking the highest allocation at 4.8 trillion Shillings. This is followed by Energy and education at 2.4 trillion, Health at 1.8 trillion and Security at 1.4 trillion Shillings among others.

 The 2017/2018 budget under the "Industrialisation for job creation and shared prosperity" is expected to increase to 29 trillion shillings from 26.3 trillion allocated for the ending financial.

Parliament approved the budget last week as required by the Public Finance Management Act 2015.  Like in the previous financial years, Minister Kasaija's budget maintains a big portion of allocations to the infrastructure sector.
  
Agriculture which employs majority of Ugandans is allocated 863 billion Shillings, while Water and Environment takes 595 billion Shillings.
  
At least 7.6 trillion Shillings will go towards recurrent expenditure, 11.4 trillion for development expenditure while 9.9 trillion is for statutory expenditure.
 
But several Ugandans insist that social services like health, access to water and social protection issues should be prioritized by Government.
 
Deus Baguma, a vendor states that health and education should come top on the list of allocations. He says for long roads and works have dominated the budget.
 
//Cue in: "Mu byonna obulamu…
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Rona Namono says unlike some people who can afford private health care, many Ugandans don't have access to good health.
 
//Cue in: "Era we ba…
Cue out: …dagala ku pharmacy."//
 
A 24-year-old police officer says most money should now go to agriculture looking at the rate at which people are dying of hunger.
 
//Cue in: "They would have…
Cue out: …they are suffering"//
  
Geoffrey Kabanda says money should be channeled towards supporting teachers.
  
//Cue in: "Abasomesa ba ba..
Cue out:ne ba tekkako masomero."//

 

About the author

Alex Otto
“Journalism that changes lives is my goal,” Alex Otto has said on more than one occasion. That is his career’s guiding principle. Has been since he was a radio journalist in the northern Ugandan town of Gulu in 2009.

Otto passionately believes his journalism should bring to the fore the voices of the voiceless like the shooting victims of Apaa. Otto tries in his journalism to ask tough questions to those in positions of authority.

Based in the Kampala bureau, Otto is especially interested in covering agriculture, politics, education, human rights, crime, environment and business. He has reported intensively on the post-conflict situation in northern Uganda.

A URN staff member since 2014, Otto previously worked with The Observer Newspaper from 2012 to 2013 and later the Institute for War and Peace Reporting IWPR based in Gulu.

He was the URN Gulu bureau chief 2014-2016.