UWA Officials Move to Control Influx of Elephants from South Sudan

2243 Views Adjumani, Uganda

In short
Trans-boundary elephants especially from Nimule National Park in South Sudan have on several occasions destroyed numerous acres of food crops belonging to hundreds of small scale farmers in the two sub-counties.

Uganda Wildlife Authority (UWA) has confirmed that, they have for the past one year managed to scale down the level of regular invasion by marauding elephants in the sub-counties of Arinyapi and Dzaipi in Adjumani district.
 
Trans-boundary elephants especially from Nimule National Park in South Sudan have on several occasions destroyed numerous acres of food crops belonging to hundreds of small scale farmers in the two sub-counties.
 
But due to constant complaints raised by the residents in the affected areas, currently the game rangers have resorted to a new strategy of sealing the various entry points some of which are previously being used by three families of elephants which usually consists of at least sixty elephants.
 
Pabious Duli, the officer in-charge of East Madi Wildlife Reserve, says the elephants passing via the corridor of Arinyapi and Elegu in Amuru district normally resort to massive destruction of crops because some residents have settled on the old paths of the elephants.
 
He said they have contained the frequent movements of the elephants by keeping close watch at the various crossing points adding that, their efforts will restore the once soaring relationship between the local community and the park officials.
 
Derimu Clay Henry, the local council III chairperson of Dzaipi sub-county however urged the Uganda Wildlife Authority officials to open a semi-unit at the sub-county for timely response since the elephants are known for being good at coming up with new strategies.
 
Last year hundreds of farmers in Arinyapi and Dzaipi sub-counties threatened to drag the government to court for failing to compensate hundreds of acres of food crops which they claimed were destroyed by elephants.
 
But the officer in-charge of East Madi Wildlife Reserve told them to look for better ways of addressing their grievances since they do not have a policy which allows the authority to compensate for the destroyed food crops.