Cervical Cancer Patients Fail to Report to UCI Over Funds

1368 Views Moroto, Uganda

In short
Joyce Nalibe, an attendant to one of the patients with cervical cancer in Kaabong hospital, says they cant afford transport and related costs of taking their mother to Kampala for cancer treatment.

Several women diagnosed with cervical cancer in Karamoja have failed to make it to Uganda Cancer Institute-UCI for treatment due to lack of funds.


Statistics at Moroto Regional Referral Hospital show that at least four women are diagnosed with cervical cancer every month. Kaabong and Matany Hospitals register two cases each month.




Dr. Dansan Atim, the Medical Superintendent Kaabong Hospital, says while some of the mothers are referred to Uganda Cancer Institute for further management, many fail to travel.  


He says most of the victims return home after being referred to UCI and returned with complications.

 
//Cue in "we are battling…
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Cervical cancer begins with abnormal changes in the cervical tissue. The risk of developing these abnormal changes is associated with infection with human papillomavirus (HPV). 



Early sexual contact and multiple sexual partners and oral contraceptives increase the risk of cervical cancer because they lead to greater exposure to HPV.
 

Dr. Alfred Francis Ogwang, the Director Moroto Regional Referral Hospital, says most of the mothers diagnosed with cervical cancer report late to hospital. 


He notes that while the number of women seeking health services especially screening of cancer has increased more needs to be done to reach villages. 


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Joyce Nalibe, an attendant to one of the patients with cervical cancer in Kaabong hospital, says they can't afford transport and related costs of taking their mother to Kampala for cancer treatment.
 

She told URN that after receiving referral information to Kampala, the family has only been able to raise Shillings 200,000.


However, Dr. John Anguzu, the Nakapiripirit District Health Officer, says the cancer burden in his district is yet to be recorded since cancer screening services are limited. 


"Our people have very poor health seeking behaviors and we have a challenge with personnel in Tokora, the only Health Centre four in the district. Sometimes the staff is overwhelmed by other duties that don't allow them to conduct screening of women", he said.


A report by the consortium of Uganda Cancer Society published in June this year put the Cervical cancer burden at 45 per every 100,000 compared to the global incidence of 15 women diagnosed with cancer per every 100,000 women.


 
Cervical cancer is caused by the human papilloma-virus, HPV that is spread during intercourse. It arises from the cervix due to the abnormal growth of cells that have the ability to invade or spread to other parts of the body. 


It later presents with symptoms of abnormal vaginal bleeding, pelvic pain, or pain during sexual intercourse.